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People Everywhere Are Working for the Greater Good in the Second Half of Life
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Civic Ventures in the News: 2009
  • "Resolution for a new decade: Work with meaning"
    RetirementRevised.com
    By Mark Miller
    December 30, 2009
    Full article
    Even before the economic crisis began, many boomers already were refocusing their energies on second careers - and many are looking for work that will help them leave a positive legacy. "The needs in the country and in our communities are more stark and present and in the news," says John Gomperts, president of Civic Ventures. "People are alert to the fact that there are serious problems, and they are concerned."
  • "10 Who Took Part in 2009"
    TakePart (blog)
    By Ben Murray
    December 26, 2009
    Full article
    Social action blog TakePart named 10 visionaries who "by action, idea or force of will," made an impact in 2009. At the top of the list is Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures.
  • "The Rise of the Encore Careerist"
    Associations Now
    By Jennifer J. Salopek
    December 20, 2009
    Full article
    New roles pursued by baby boomers during the second half of their professional lives permit them to apply their skills and experience while giving back. Associations that create opportunities for encore careerists will find a rich reservoir of knowledge, skill and resilience that can position them well into the future.
  • "Life (Part 2): Encore Careers"
    PBS
    December 17, 2009
    Full article
    Robert Lipstye, host of the PBS series Life (Part 2), sits down with Marc Freedman, founder and CEO of Civic Ventures and The Purpose Prize - an award given annually to social entrepreneurs, age 60-plus, who take on society's biggest challenges. Freedman speaks passionately and offers advice about finding work that matters.
  • "Life (Part 2): Purpose Prize Winners"
    PBS
    December 16, 2009
    Full article
    This installment of the PBS series Life (Part 2) showcases winners of The Purpose Prize - an award given to individuals over 60 who have followed through on their dreams of doing good. Meet Sharon Rohrbach, a retired nurse who created a system for ensuring medical care for newborns; and Jock Brandis, a former film and television gaffer who invented a peanut-shelling machine for female laborers in Africa.
  • "10 Reasons You Shouldn't Retire"
    US News
    By Emily Brandon
    December 14, 2009
    Full article
    It's time to retire the idea of retirement--or at least push it back by a few years. The financial incentives to delay retirement are obvious and dramatic. And recent research even suggests that working part time in retirement can improve your health. Here are 10 reasons you shouldn't quit your day job. Among them: Society needs your skills. The oldest members of the population typically have the most experience and acquired wisdom. Many older workers also want to give something back to society. "They are really yearning for something that leaves a legacy," says Marci Alboher, a senior fellow at Civic Ventures and author of One Person/Multiple Careers: A New Model for Work/Life Success. "They are reorganizing their priorities and figuring out how they can have the most impact." A 2008 MetLife Foundation and Civic Ventures survey of Americans ages 44 through 70 found that over half (54 percent) are interested in or already have a second career helping others. The top late-life career choices were education, healthcare, government, and other organizations that serve a public good.
  • "An Angel Gets His Wings: Local Full Belly founder gets UNCW's Clarence Award"
    Encore Online
    By Adrian Varnam
    December 8, 2009
    Full article
    This year's Clarence Award was presented to the founder of the Full Belly Project, Jock Brandis. Nominees are recommended every fall by citizens to recognize the angelic nature of someone in the area. The the winner is voted on by an anonymous committee of faculty and students of the University of North Carolina in Wilmington. In 2001 Brandis traveled to Mali, Africa, to help a friend in the Peace Corps repair some machinery. He made a promise to some village women to locate a machine back in the States to help them shell peanuts more efficiently, a technological advancement that would provide more food and income from the trade. When Brandis returned to find nothing of the sort here in America, he invented one himself. The result, the Universal Nut Sheller, was the impetus for the founding of his non-profit organization, Full Belly Project, and garnered Brandis a 2008 $100,000 Purpose Prize.
  • "Non-profit helps career changes to public service"
    KGO(ABC)-TV San Francisco
    By Teresa Garcia
    December 7, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    Civic Ventures is spearheading an effort to give people a way to change their careers in an effort to find more social useful ways to live their lives. Jim Emerman of Civic Ventures is helping facilitate such encore moves. The national think tank has launched an encore careers campaign to help a highly-educated pool of baby boomer talent use their skills and transition into a new chapter of life. "We really need this kind of talent. There are all kinds of shortages of people to work with youth, people to work on health care issues, people to address environmental challenges that we face," said Emerman. After nearly three decades working at Hewlett Packard, Nigel Ball said goodbye to his high-tech career and hello to his passion for public education. He is now director of marketing for a Bay Area nonprofit called RAFT, or Resource Area for Teaching. It re-purposes donated materials into creative, hands-on learning tools. That educators use to help teach students subjects like science and math.
  • "Whatever Happened To ... Akbar Ahmed and Judea Pearl?"
    Washington Post
    By Becky Krystal
    December 6, 2009
    Full article
    Five years ago, American University professor Akbar Ahmed and UCLA professor Judea Pearl were traveling the country, "two grandfathers on a stage," trying to promote understanding between Jews and Muslims. Their dialogues earned them the 2006 Purpose Prize, a $100,000 award that recognizes social innovators older than 60. The two have since taken a break from the events, but the Daniel Pearl Foundation -- named after the slain journalist, who was Judea Pearl's son -- would like to schedule more next year. From September 2008 through this summer, Ahmed and a team of students explored Muslim culture across America, resulting in a newly released documentary, "Journey Into America." A companion book is set to be published in 2010.
  • "Inventor and retired MU professor Henry Liu died in crash Tuesday"
    Missourian
    December 2, 2009
    Full article
    2009 Purpose Prize winner Henry Liu was killed in a single-vehicle car crash. After earning a Ph.D. from Colorado State University, Liu worked as an MU civil engineering professor for more than 20 years. While at MU, he directed the Capsule Pipeline Research Center, which is funded by the National Science Foundation to develop capsule pipeline technology to transport freight. Liu was awarded the $100,000 Purpose Prize award in October 2009 for developing environmentally-friendly bricks from fly ash - a toxic byproduct of burning coal. This production method is more efficient and does not contribute to air pollution.
  • "Finding Work After 50"
    Good Morning America
    By Tory Johnson
    December 1, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    Good Morning America profiles three women in encore careers, including 2009 Purpose Prize winner Jan Albert. Caring for her parents -- her mother has Alzheimer's Disease, her father has Parkinson's Disease-- inspired Albert's encore career. Albert, then out of work in her real estate career, found such fulfillment in the caretaking experience that she and her sister started an eldercare service. Albert earned a gerontology certificate at a nearby community college, which she pursued with financial assistance. Tory Johnson also wrote an online version of this report, Finding Jobs Now: Silver Lining for Older Workers.
  • "Hire Yourself: Becoming an Entrepreneur When You Can't Find a Job"
    AARP Bulletin
    By Elizabeth Pope
    December 1, 2009
    Full article
    Passion is what drove University of Missouri civil engineering professor and 2009 Purpose Prize winner Henry Liu to leave teaching in 2001 and launch an R&D firm for environmental technology. His latest invention, "green bricks" made from waste byproducts of coal-fired power plants, has been licensed in 11 countries. "It took nine years for the company to return a profit," says Liu. "But profit was not my primary motivation. I was trying to get these environmentally friendly technologies to the commercial market." Liu works every day, 10 hours a day.
  • "Baby Boomers Back to Work"
    Arizona Central.com/KPNX(NBC)
    December 1, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    Boomers are making an impact as caregivers at Encore Opportunity winner Dawn Trapp's Caring Connections program at the Citivan Foundation. Citivan is specifically seeking boomers to work with the program, reaching out to those who may be out of work, or eager to come back from retirement.
  • "Connie Siskowski's Encore Career: Supporting Young Caregivers"
    Service Wire
    November 30, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    This podcast, originally run on Idealist.org, features the story of 2009 Purpose Prize winner Connie Siskowski, who founded The Caregiving Youth Project, which provides support groups, classes and resources for youth who are the primary caregivers for ill or disabled family members.
  • "Inspiration Break: Civic Ventures and Encore Careers Name Purpose Prize Winners"
    Service Nation
    November 30, 2009
    Full article
    A lot of people talk about how important it is to engage youth in creating positive social change - and it is. But it's equally important that we not forget the other age groups out there that can make a big difference, too, and that's why we at BTC love our ServiceNation coalition member Civic Ventures. Every year, Encore.org, published by the folks at Civic Ventures, gives out 10 Purpose Prizes. Here's a Here's an overview of the incredible people who won the 2009 award. (With links to CV profiles): Elizabeth and Stephen Alderman; Judith Broder; Don Coyhis; Henry Liu; Tim Will; Marcy Adelman; Duncan Campbell; Ann Higdon; Connie Siskowski; and James Smallwood. Included are several videos of the Purpose Prize winners on the EncoreCareers YouTube channel.
  • "New resource from Civic Ventures helps Boomers and anyone transitioning careers "
    Examiner.com
    By Miriam Salpete
    November 30, 2009
    Full article
    With record levels of unemployment, all job seekers are looking for new ideas and resources to help move their search forward successfully. Boomers come to the table with concerns about ageism, about interviewing with bosses young enough to be their children and about the fact that job search techniques and methods have changed dramatically since they last looked for opportunities. For Boomers (or any job seeker) ready for a real career change after their primary career has ended, a terrific resource is available. Civic Ventures provides information and advice to help people transition to encore careers. Civic ventures recently hired Marci Alboher, a highly respected expert on career issues and workplace trends to help those hoping to transition to meaningful and different career opportunities.
  • "Soldiers Project helps vets cope with war's mental scars"
    LA Times
    By Nicole Santa Cruz
    November 28, 2009
    Full article
    Before he was deployed to Iraq, Scott Shore refused to take aspirin for headaches. Six years later, suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, he takes six medications daily for ailments ranging from depression to insomnia. But another part of Shore's therapy began in January with the Soldiers Project. The LA-based nonprofit includes a network of mental health professionals who provide free, unlimited, confidential counseling to service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and their families. Psychiatrist and 2009 Purpose Prize winner Judith Broder founded the Soldiers Project in 2005; since then the network has expanded across Southern California and to Sacramento, Seattle, Chicago, New York and Boston. The licensed mental health professionals practice from their private offices, eliminating the long lines and crowds of people often seen at the VA.
  • "Forget Florida; she's staying in Detroit"
    Time Magazine (Detroit Blog)
    By Karen Dybis
    November 23, 2009
    Full article
    Everyone needs a purpose. For Dr. Linda Johnson, it is to help Detroit be a great place to live.The Detroit resident was recognized last month as a Purpose Prize Fellow, an honor for social entrepreneurs ages 60 and up. Johnson and her husband could be enjoying a quiet retirement. Instead, they are knee-deep in Detroit: the city, its people and its problems. "I tried to retire three times," said Johnson, a former elementary school principal. "I just can't seem to do it." Johnson was honored for her work with the Wayne County Mortgage Foreclosure Prevention Program, a program she became intimately familiar with after nearly losing her own home; she and her husband became victims of a predatory lender.
  • "Years Can Be Assets in a Job Hunt"
    Wall Street Journal - Marketwatch
    By Andrea Coombs
    November 22, 2009
    Full article
    Hunting for a job is never easy, but it can be even harder when your hair goes gray. After a rejection or three, it often becomes difficult to go to another interview without the worrisome feeling that stereotypes are working against you. But it's just that attitude that may torpedo your chances of landing a job. "If you have an expectation that there will be age bias, you will probably find it," says Marci Alboher, a senior fellow with Civic Ventures. The trick, Ms. Alboher says, is to confront biases head-on by laying to rest common stereotypes.
  • "Business Updates"
    Winston-Salem journal
    By Fran Daniel
    November 22, 2009
    Full article
    Mary Martin Niepold has been named a 2009 Purpose Prize Fellow. Niepold, the founder of the Nyanya Project based in Winston-Salem, was named a fellow for her work training skills to African grandmothers caring for their grandchildren orphaned by AIDS. The Nyanya Project, started in 2007, has programs in Kenya, Tanzania and Rwanda to assist nyanyas (Swahili for grandmother), who live on less than $1 a day with no government assistance.
  • Encore Opportunity Award Blog Coverage

    November 18, 2009
    "2009 Encore Opportunity Award Winners...Retirement, Redefined" -- Fast Company
    "The Encore Opportunity Awards" - Nonprofit Conversation
    "Nonprofit Conversation: The Encore Opportunity Awards" - Cleaning Jobs
    "Experts That Still Project Talent Shortages Awarded" - RFP Connect
    "Umbrella Wins National Award" - Umbrella of the Capital District
    "Innovative Recruitment and Staffing Strategies by Employers Help Workers Over 50 Find, Thrive in Encore Careers" - Treehugger
  • "Nonprofit honored for 'encore' career program"
    Times Union (NY)
    November 18, 2009
    Full article
    Umbrella of the Capital District was awarded an Encore Opportunity Award at a ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. Umbrella was one of just eight organizations nationwide honored for making it easier for older workers to transition into encore careers - paid jobs that offer meaning and the chance to make a social impact. Founded in 1995, Umbrella recruits age 50-plus workers with skills such as carpentry and painting who in turn help area senior citizens and people with disabilities maintain their homes. Umbrella workers also help the elderly and disabled with grocery shopping, transportation and house cleaning.
  • "White Bison founder says award will fund his dream"
    Indian Country Today
    By Carol Berry
    November 16, 2009
    Full article
    Don Coyhis, member of the Mohican Nation, Stockbridge Munsee Reservation, and founder and president of the nonprofit White Bison Inc., was honored with a Purpose Prize from Civic Ventures. Coyhis plans to use the $100,000 prize to create a national Native Wellbriety Institute in Colorado Springs, CO. The Institute will allow representatives from widespread Native American tribes to come and receive Native-centric Wellbreity training to bring back to their communities. Coyhis, 30 years sober himself points to a recent government study that found that alcohol-related deaths among Native Americans to be more than three times those of the general population.
  • "Soldiers Project Aims To Heal War's Mental Scars"
    NPR
    By Gloria Hillard
    November 14, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    Four years ago Judith Broder, a clinical psychiatrist, saw a play in Los Angeles called "The Sand Storm: Stories from the Front." Written by a Marine, it featured monologues of those who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Deeply affected by the play, Broder put her retirement plans on hold and founded the Soldiers Project. It provides free counseling not only to service members returning from war - but to their families as well. Today, the Soldiers Project has more than 200 licensed therapists nationwide - all volunteers who have received specialized training in everything from combat-related traumas to military culture. Broder was named a 2009 Purpose Prize winner for her work.
  • "Profiles in Later Life "
    Wall Street Journal
    November 14, 2009
    Full article
    The Wall Street Journal profiles Civic Ventures Purpose Prize winners. Thirty years ago, Arlene Blum lead a charge against the use of toxic chemicals in consumer products. Now she's back in the fight, and in 2008 founded the Green Science Policy Institute, which provides scientific research on dangerous chemicals to government, industry and non-governmental organizations. Michele McRae has devoted her retirement to helping refugees make a start for themselves in the Northern Plains. She is director of Giving + Learning, a group that pairs volunteers with newly arrived immigrants to help them learn English, pass their driver's test, and train for jobs. Catalino Tapia, an immigrant himself, created the Bay Area Gardeners Foundation, a nonprofit that provides college scholarships to low-income students. The organization has raised more than $500,000 to award as scholarships. Retired marketing executive Mark Goldsmith started a program called Getting Out and Staying Out to help former inmates on Rikers Island make new starts. To date, the organization has helped 1000+ former inmates with post-release plans. Jock Brandis is the director of research and development at Full Belly Project, a nonprofit he set up in 2003 to distribute his own invention, a simple nut-shelling machine that can be made by pouring concrete into a mold. The Universal Nut Sheller, costs about $30 and turns the chore of nut-shelling into an easy job - liberating poor populations from a time-consuming and hand-crippling task.
  • "The Case Against Retirement"
    Business Week Special Report
    November 11, 2009
    Full article
    In this special report, Business Week presents a series of articles and video pieces. Cue the second act: What's the next step when work ends? Today's retirees are pursuing opportunities like starting small businesses or launching philanthropic endeavors. Among the included articles are:

    "How to Search for an Encore Career" - Marci Alboher, senior fellow at Civic Ventures and a career expert and author, recommends volunteering or tapping your social network to find new career opportunities in this video.

    "How to Discover Your Encore Career: Undertaking a post-retirement career can be daunting - but rewarding" - by Karyn McCormack.Undertaking a post-retirement career can be daunting - but rewarding. BusinessWeek asked experts for tips to help you start your second act, including starting at Encore.org.

    "Encore Careers: 16 Success Stories" - among those profiled is James Otieno, 49, who retired from a position as a vice president at Hewlett-Packard to starting the Karibu Rafiki Foundation, which he created as an Encore Fellow with Civic Ventures.
  • "Which Way, L.A.?"
    KCRW
    November 11, 2009
    Full article
    2009 Purpose Prize winner Judith Broder is among the panel guests on this public affairs show, hosted by Warren Olney. The topic of the program - "Iran and Diplomatic Confusion; LA Veterans Home from the Wars." Broder is a clinical psychiatrist, who in her late 60s, created The Soldiers Project, which provides free psychological support to returning soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • "Which Way, L.A.?"
    KCRW
    November 11, 2009
    Full article
    2009 Purpose Prize winner Judith Broder is among the panel guests on this public affairs show, hosted by Warren Olney. The topic of the program - "Iran and Diplomatic Confusion; LA Veterans Home from the Wars." Broder is a clinical psychiatrist, who in her late 60s, created The Soldiers Project, which provides free psychological support to returning soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • "SOFAR co-founders named Purpose Prize fellows"
    Wicked Local Cambridge
    November 10, 2009
    Full article
    SOFAR co-founders, Dr. Jaine L. Darwin and Dr. Kenneth Reich, were named 2009 Purpose Prize fellows. Darwin and Reich, of the Cambridge-based SOFAR (Strategic Outreach to Families of All Reservists), were named fellows for their work providing free psychological services and support to the families and loved ones of Army reservists and National Guard deployed in Afghanistan, Iraq and Kuwait. The fellows underscore a trend in entrepreneurialism later in life. According to studies by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the 55- to 64-year-old age group is the most active in creating new ventures.
  • "Scarsdale resident recognized for her charity work for Afghanistan"
    LoHud.com (NY)
    By Ernie Garcia
    November 8, 2009
    Full article
    The Sept. 11, 2001, attacks spurred many to action, including Bruce and Dana Freyer, who helped set up a charity for Afghanistan. Dana Freyer serves as chairwoman of the New York City-based Global Partnership for Afghanistan. Her work to help rural Afghans plant fruit orchards, tree farms and vineyards has helped more than 10,000 Afghan farmers set up enterprises and led to the planting of more than 6 million trees in that environmentally degraded country since 2004. Lasst weekend Dana Freyer traveled to Stanford University in California to be honored as a Purpose Prize Fellow.
  • "Rutherford program is an economic model, deserves recognition"
    Citizen-Times (NC)
    November 6, 2009
    Full article
    Anyone looking for evidence that Margaret Mead got it right when she said a few committed people can change the world needs look no further than Rutherford County. That's where Foothills Connect Business and Technology Center is transforming the area's food system and returning a once farm-based economy to its agrarian roots, thanks to the ideas and initiative of Executive Director Tim Will. Last week, Civic Ventures recognized Will's accomplishment by awarding him the Purpose Prize, which goes to social innovators over 60 who make significant contributions in their encore careers.
  • "Blending Agriculture and Technology to Create New Jobs"
    Huffington Post
    By Mark Miller
    November 5, 2009
    Full article
    2009 Purpose Prize winner Tim Will and his wife Eleanor moved to rural North Carolina hoping to pursue a decades-old dream to become organic farmers. Will had spent his career in telecommunications and more recently become a high school teacher in Miami, Florida. But Will's plan changed. He's now leading a unique effort to transform a region hit hard by globalization into an Internet-fueled center for locally-grown organic food. The initiative is taking residents back to their agricultural roots and putting them back to work. Along with Will, this year's Purpose Prize winners include a psychiatrist who helps saves soldiers' lives by offering free mental health treatment, a former NASA executive who works to treat alcoholism in Native American communities by reviving old customs and traditions, and a couple who honor their son, killed on 9/11, by helping to bring mental health services to countries ravaged by terrorism, violence and war.
  • "JFP Person of the Day: Bill Chandler"
    Jackson Free Press
    By Kelly Brignac
    November 5, 2009
    Full article
    Bill Chandler, executive director and founder of Jackson-based Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance, does not let being 68 stop him from doing good. He is an advocate for immigrant rights throughout the state of Mississippi. He has been named a 2009 Purpose Prize Fellow. Chandler started MIRA in 2000 after noticing abuse of Latino and Asian immigrants through his work as a union organizer in Mississippi and throughout the South. He particularly noticed abuses against farm, hospitality and construction workers, especially after Hurricane Katrina. Chandler says the North American Free Trade Agreement has had a devastating effect on the agricultural economy in Mexico. Many farmers became destitute and began coming to the U.S. to support their families, settling in the Deep South. "Once these people are here, they have basic human needs, like you and me. And once they are here, we try to protect and expand the rights they have," he says.
  • "Late-life problem-solver wins national award for innovative N.C. mountains-to-market network"
    Local Tech Wire
    November 5, 2009
    Full article
    Timothy Will, who settled in Rutherfordton, N.C., and created a successful virtual and physical connection between local farmers and Charlotte chefs, has been named one of the 2009 winners of the $100,000 Purpose Prize. Will took a job as a small-business developer with the Foothills Connect Business & Technology Center in Rutherfordton, in Rutherford County. The center was created to support small business entrepreneurs and provide community Internet access, but to that point it had done little more than set up a handful of computer terminals for public use. Less than a month later, the director resigned. Will was promoted to the top post almost by default. Will secured a $1.4 million grant from the state's Golden LEAF to wire the county's schools and police and fire departments. He also rounded up local farmers and realized there was a farm-to-restaurant opportunity waiting. The result was the Farmers Fresh Market and online ordering.
  • "Wellbriety program wins purpose prize "
    Native American Times
    By W. Lee Morrow
    November 4, 2009
    Full article
    Wellbriety, a program designed to aid Native Americans to defeat alcoholism, has won a $100,000 Purpose Prize. The program was developed by White Bison, Inc. and its founder Don Coyhis (Mohican Nation). Wellbriety takes a uniquely Native American approach to confronting the problem of alcoholism. Coyhis established the White Bison non-profit organization; it's Wellbriety program emphasizes the involvement of family and tribe in the recovery efforts. The program uses a medicine wheel 12-step plan, drumming circles, healing ceremonies, as well as service to one's tribe, to foster total recovery. White Bison has trained over 200 individuals to implement the Wellbriety programs in Native American communities across the country.
  • "Retirement means a new career for some"
    Market Watch
    By Andrea Coombs
    November 4, 2009
    Full article
    When you retire, do you plan to visit your grandkids, go on a few trips, relax a little? That was Judith Broder's plan. But then she found herself profoundly moved by a play that chronicled Iraq war veterans' struggle when they return home. Broder, a psychiatrist with 35 years' experience, couldn't stop thinking about those soldiers. The result? Now she's busier than ever organizing volunteer therapists who provide free, confidential counseling for veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Her organization, The Soldiers Project, has grown to more than 200 volunteers nationwide, helping soldiers and their families come to terms with their profoundly difficult experience. Broder was named a 2009 $100,000 Purpose Prize winner for her work. For his part, Duncan Campbell -- winner of a $50,000 Purpose Prize -- sold his investment firm The Campbell Group to fund his project. Friends of the Children provides paid mentors -- their official title is "friends" -- for poor, abused or neglected children -- kids most likely to end up in the juvenile justice system when they reach their teens
  • "Rutherfordton innovator gets $100,000 prize for connecting local farmers"
    Mountain Xpress
    By David Forbes
    November 4, 2009
    Full article
    Over the past few years, Tim Will, 61, of Rutherfordton, has worked to bring broadband to his county and connect local farmers with restaurants that need their produce. Now he's been recognized with a $100,000 Purpose Prize. In his work with the Foothills Connect Business and Technology Center, Will has overseen the laying of 100 miles of fiber-optic cable throughout the area while providing training in computers and sustainable agriculture to the area's farmers. He also set up a way for Charlotte restaurants to buy food from local producers online, something he says works out well for both the farmers and the restaurateurs.
  • "Fulfillment at Any Age"
    Psychology Today (blog)
    By Susan Krauss Whitbourne, Ph.D.
    November 3, 2009
    Full article
    How do some people manage to remain creative and productive into their 80s, 90s, and beyond? Gathered in Palo Alto, CA at Stanford University to honor the 2009 Purpose Prize awards, psychologists Laura Carstensen, Philip Zimbardo, and William Damon spoke on a panel and challenged our social conventions about careers. The Stanford panel suggested some ways that we can avoid those traps -- take a "sabbatical" from your career and go back to school for a while, find work that is truly fulfilling and will leave a legacy, and make inter-generational connections. Author Susan Krauss Whitbourne links to Marci Alboher's blog piece, "Choosing good work instead of good exits from work."
  • "Williamstown man honored for city work"
    Courier Post (NJ)
    November 2, 2009
    Full article
    A Williamstown man who runs a private nonprofit job training program in downtown Camden has won national recognition and $50,000 for his work. James Smallwood, founder of The Choice Is Yours was one of 10 "social innovators over 60" to win a Purpose Prize from Civic Ventures. Smallwood, 62, founded his organization in 1997 after fighting off an addiction to cocaine. That experience, he said, motivated him to dedicate his life to helping the "unfortunate" get training, case management and job placement. About 600 ex-convicts, homeless people and drug addicts in Philadelphia and South Jersey have gone through the free program, Smallwood said.
  • "Entrepreneurship"
    Yakima Herald - Republic
    November 2, 2009
    Full article
    Jan Seago has been named a 2009 Purpose Prize fellow. Seago, a Yakima resident and program liaison of the Moscow, Idaho-based Pacific Northwest Regional Water Program, was named a fellow for her innovative use of video documentaries of Pacific Northwest watershed issues. Issues covered included storm water management and capacity building for watershed-based groups working on environmental restoration to improve habitat for native salmon, steel head, and bull trout protected by the Endangered Species Act.
  • "Cassidy: Second careers that give back"
    Mercury News
    By Mike Cassidy
    November 1, 2009
    Full article
    After 23 years at Hewlett-Packard, James Otieno, age 47, retired from his position as vice president of executive services and compensation services. He became a retired man, married with three kids, who was asking a question: Now what? It's a question you can almost hear echo across Silicon Valley, a place where many achieve personal goals, tremendous wealth or career supremacy at an early age. Otieno discovered a program in the Bay Area called Encore Fellows, a concerted effort by San Francisco-based Civic Ventures to match restless, retired executives with nonprofits in need. He found a match with the Silicon Valley Education Foundation, which works to bolster education in Santa Clara County. Now as vice president of partnerships, strategy and technology, Otieno has revamped the foundation's human resources operation, helped prepare its five-year strategy and is working on a Web site that lets teachers share lesson plans.
  • "Father of Invention"
    Coumbia Daily Tribune
    By T. J. Greaney
    October 31, 2009
    Full article
    Nearly a decade ago, 2009 Purpose Prize winner Henry Liu, now 73, took early retirement from a highly successful career at the University of Missouri School of Engineering. He was an internationally acclaimed expert in pipeline engineering and helped MU land a prestigious National Science Foundation grant. The money went to fund a center for the study of pipeline technology for eight years. Liu threw his efforts into developing technology to compact environmentally hazardous fly ash, the residue left over when coal is burned in power plants, into commercially usable and fully contained bricks. The bricks should be commercially available in the spring. He also has licensed the technology to companies in 10 other countries.
  • "Think It's Over Once You're 60? Check Out The Purpose Prize"
    Huffington Post
    By Julie Moulden
    October 31, 2009
    Full article
    This is the true story of a couple of ordinary Americans who thought, once they turned 60, that life would be uneventful. That maybe the marriage of their three children - and the grandchildren to come - would be the highlight. Instead, they've just won a Purpose Prize. Elizabeth and Stephen Alderman's son lost his life in the World Trade Center on 9/11. Soon after, watching a story on Nightline about the estimated one billion survivors of trauma around the world, the Aldrermans realized what they needed to do. "We couldn't help our son, but we can do something for those who survive." They founded the Peter C. Alderman Foundation, to help create mental health systems in strife-torn countries, and to help local caregivers learn how to treat people who are suffering from conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. In just eight years, they've established nine clinics and trained 385 local doctors who have, in turn, trained more than 400 health care professionals. And over 100,000 people have been helped to date in Cambodia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Liberia, Rwanda, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Burundi, the Congo, and Zimbabwe.
  • "LGBT senior housing pioneer receives Purpose Prize"
    Bay Area Reporter
    By Heather Cassell
    October 29, 2009
    Full article
    The founder of San Francisco's LGBT housing and services agency Openhouse will be honored by Civic Ventures with the Purpose Prize for her entrepreneurial spirit and work improving housing and social services for LGBT seniors. This is the first time an out lesbian has been selected for the award in its four-year history, according to Alexandra Kent, the director for the Purpose Prize of Civic Ventures. Openhouse evolved following the 2003 death of Adelman's partner, Jeanette Gurevitch. Both women founded what was then called Rainbow Adult Community Housing after witnessing their friends becoming displaced after being evicted or forced out of their apartments more than 10 years ago. Openhouse is currently in the process of building its first LGBT-friendly affordable senior retirement community of 88 units.
  • "Tim Will's second act blends agriculture and technology to create new jobs"
    Retirement Revised
    By Mark Miller
    October 28, 2009
    Full article
    Tim Will and his wife Eleanor moved to Rutherford County in rural North Carolina a few years hoping to pursue a decades-old dream to become organic farmers. Tim had spent his career working for big telecommunications companies as a systems analyst, and more recently had taught history and geography in an urban Miami high school. But Rutherford County had bigger plans for Will. He's unexpectedly found himself leading a unique effort to transform a region hit hard by globalization into an Internet-fueled center for locally-grown organic food. The initiative is taking residents back to their agricultural roots-and putting them back to work. Will has been named a 2009 Purpose Prize winner for his work bringing broadband Internet to Rutherford County and for starting Farmers Fresh Market, an online ordering system that connects Charlotte restaurants with Rutherfordton farmers. *** This article also ran in the Aurora Sentinel.
  • "Foothills director gets national recognition"
    The Digital Courier
    By Larry Dale
    October 27, 2009
    Full article
    Tim Will, executive director of Foothills Connect Business & Technology Center, has been selected for a $100,000 2009 Purpose Prize. Alexandra Céspedes Kent, director of the Purpose Prize, explained why Will was selected. "Tim Will is a former telecommunications executive who saw an opportunity to connect his community's agrarian past to a new digital future. Tim Will won the Purpose Prize for his innovative approach to solving important and timely issues: job creation in a depressed economy, environmental sustainability and the preservation of family farms. He is an inspiring role model for other adults who want to use their life and work experience to improve the lives of others."
  • "Civic Ventures honors Openhouse co-founder"
    San Francisco Chronicle
    By Andrew S. Ross
    October 27, 2009
    Full article
    Eleven years ago, San Francisco clinical psychologist Marcy Adelman co-founded Openhouse, a nonprofit organization aimed at meeting the oft-unmet social, housing and health care needs of LGBT seniors. Adelman, 63, is one of 10 nationwide recipients of the Purpose Prize, awarded annually by Civic Ventures. For Adelman, shining a light on the aging LGBT community is "something I've cared about most of my adult life." The organization she co-founded in 1998 with her late partner, Jeanette Gurevitch, has trained more than 1,500 health care providers statewide and created community networks for LGBT seniors in need. On the drawing board: An 88-unit LGBT-friendly affordable housing project in San Francisco.
  • "Palm Beach County caregiving leader wins national prize"
    South Florida Sun Sentinel
    October 27, 2009
    Full article
    She's worked for years to help Palm Beach County's disadvantaged youths and neediest residents. Now Connie Siskowski, founder and president of Boca Raton-based Volunteers for the Homebound & Family Caregivers, has a national award in honor of her efforts. On Monday, Siskowski became one of 10 winners of the 2009 Purpose Prize. Siskowski, 63, was praised for her work in establishing the Caregiving Youth Project, which helps 240 students in five middle schools. Youth caregivers have significant responsibilities helping adult relatives who may be disabled, elderly, and physically or mentally ill.
  • "Inventor of 'Green Bricks' Wants To Build Series of Underground Tubes"
    Popular Science
    By Jeremy Hsu
    October 27, 2009
    Full article
    Forget about carrying cargo by truck, and instead imagine shuttling goods around inside a series of underground tubes. That's the hope of Henry Liu, a 73-year-old retired civil engineer and a past winner of PopSci's Inventions Awards for his environmentally safe green bricks. The inventor has received $100,000 as an "encore career" prize from Civic Ventures, and plans to use part of the money to push his vision for revolutionizing freight transportation. The network would move boxcar-sized capsules inside underground pipes across long distances, and relies on an electromagnetic pump that Liu invented along with three former colleagues at the University of Missouri.
  • "Pursuing the prize"
    OregonLive.com
    October 27, 2009
    Full article
    Editorial: Look, Duncan Campbell has nothing against golf. In fact, he's playing Pebble Beach this week. But the numbers that click and whiz through this former CPA-turned-mogul's mind have nothing to do with shaving his score. At 65, Campbell dreams of multiplying mentors and helping tens of thousands of children succeed. The nonprofit he founded, Friends of the Children, pairs gravely at-risk kindergartners -- many with teen mothers and fathers in prison -- with paid Friends. For $9,000 a year, the agency furnishes a child with four hours a week of consistent mentoring, love and guidance. Week in, week out, K-12, the total cost of a mentor per child is $117,000. So you can imagine how the brains at the agency are crunching a new number this week. Civic Ventures announced Campbell had won a $50,000 Purpose Prize -- enough to give one child the support to rocket almost halfway to adulthood.
  • "Older Do-Gooders Recognized With Purpose Prize"
    NPR Health Blog
    By Joseph Shapiro
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    The Purpose Prize recognizes people, 60 or older, who have found new purpose in the third half of life by tackling social problems. Sponsored by Civic Ventures, the prizes have become a kind of MacArthur "genius award" for retirees. This year's eleven winners include: Tim Will, 61, a retired teacher who got a grant to pay for 100 miles of fiber-optic cable to bring broadband Internet service to rural Rutherford County (NC), including its schools, police and fire departments. Wills then started Farmers Fresh Market, using the Internet connection to let local farmers sell their produce directly to consumers and Charlotte restaurants. Don Coyhis, 66, a computer executive from Colorado Springs, Colo., won for his start-up, called Wellbriety, a substance abuse recovery program geared to Native Americans. And Connie Siskowski, 63 of Boca Raton, Fl., created a support group for kids who find themselves becoming caregivers for a parent with multiple sclerosis or for an elderly relative.
  • "Springs man wins prize for Native American program"
    Sacramento Bee
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    The founder of a Colorado Springs group that helps Native Americans overcome alcoholism, drug abuse and other health issues has won a $100,000 prize from Civic Ventures. Don Coyhis, the founder of White Bison, Inc. won a 2009 Purpose Prize. The award honors innovators and initiatives solving community problems. Coyhis, 66, says he'll use the money to expand the nonprofit group he founded in 1988 and launch an institute to promote wellness - or what he calls "Wellbriety" - among the nation's 564 tribes. Coyhis marked 31 years of sobriety in August. He named his organization after an image of a white bison he saw while fasting in the Rampart Range two decades ago. It inspired him to use Indian culture to help Native Americans overcome addiction. This article also ran in: The Denver Post
  • "Older Americans Win $100,000 Prizes for New Efforts to Solve Social Problems"
    Chronicle of Philanthropy
    By Heather Joslyn
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    Six nonprofit founders and entrepreneurs, with an average age of nearly 68, have won the top awards in the fourth annual Purpose Prizes, given by Civic Ventures, a think tank in San Francisco that seeks to involve older people in civic engagement. The prizes, sponsored by Atlantic Philanthropies and the John Templeton Foundation, are designed to recognize people age 60 and up who are social innovators. Purpose Prize director Alexandra Kent explains that all the winners are working on urgent matters. "The winners and their projects really reflect what is timely and important to our country as a whole, with awards going to projects that create jobs, develops technology that aids the environment, or treats soldiers returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan."
  • "His 2d career was built on 2d chances"
    Philadelphia Inquirer
    By Matthew Spolar
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    James Smallwood, 62, has been named a Civic Ventures 2009 Purpose Prize fellow for providing job training for drug addicts and former convicts in South Jersey and Philadelphia. He turned his own life around after battling drug addiction. Smallwood had succumbed to dealing and using crack and cocaine after leaving his managerial job at a Mercury dealership in the early 80s. But Smallwood managed to complete a four-year apprenticeship with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners in Philadelphia. In 1984, he became a licensed union carpenter. After four drug-treatment programs, he got sober. Now he's running the nonprofit, The Choice Is Yours, where he raises as much as $450,000 in annual funding from local banks and nonprofits, and graduates between 200 and 260 trainees a year through 14-week programs.
  • "Innovators Over 60 Tackle World's Problems"
    Huffington Post
    By Victoria Fine
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    Civic Ventures' 2009 Purpose Prize winners were announced today. One winning couple, Elizabeth and Stephen Alderman, realized they could alleviate the suffering of thousands people to honor their son's memory: The death of their son on 9/11 brought Elizabeth and Stephen Alderman merciless grief. Soon afterward, they learned in a news report that a billion people around the world had experienced severe trauma. The Aldermans could relate. They understand: Suffering is suffering. To honor their son and to treat living victims of trauma and terrorism, they created a globally focused foundation that helps create homegrown mental health systems chiefly in Africa, where violence of all kinds -- rape, war, kidnapping, the unspeakable -- has desecrated communities.
  • "He's helping N.C. county rebuild its farming roots"
    Charlotte Observer
    By Bruce Henderson
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    Charged with growing entrepreneurs in rural Rutherford County, 2009 Purpose Prize winner Tim Will surveyed foothills numbed by 14 percent unemployment and illiteracy and limited by few high-speed links to the global marketplace. But one other statistic caught the newcomer's eye: the county's 6,000 small plots of land, much of it overgrown former farmland. What if played-out cotton fields, Will wondered, grew fruits and vegetables again? And what if the produce was marketed online to Charlotte restaurants hungry for locally raised foods? The result is Farmers Fresh Market, now ending its third year. Charlotte chefs log on to its Web site, clicking on the purple potatoes or haricot verts that please them. The produce is delivered to their kitchens within 24 hours of harvest.
  • "Springs man wins $100k prize for program that helps Native Americans"
    Denver Post
    By Debbie Kelley
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    After marking 31years of sobriety in August, Don Coyhis, 66, considered retiring from the nonprofit organization he founded 21 years ago in Colorado Springs to help Native Americans overcome alcoholism, drug abuse and other health and social issues facing their communities. This month, however, he got news that made him rethink his idea. His organization, White Bison, was named one of five winners of the Purpose Prize. The payout: $100,000. Coyhis said the money will help catapult his organization to the next level. He plans to use the prize money to move to a larger office and launch a national Native American "Wellbriety" training institute, employing the Internet and in-house programs to fulfill his vision of bringing his concepts of wellness to the nation's 564 tribes. This article also ran in: The Colorado Springs Gazette
  • "Inventor's $100K win to fund freight idea"
    Columbia Daily Tribune
    By T. J. Greaney
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    A former University of Missouri professor has won a 2009 Civic Ventures $100,000 Purpose Prize. Henry Liu, 73, invented a way to use the waste from coal-fired power plants to manufacture environmentally safe bricks. The process cures, waters and compacts at room temperature the byproduct known as fly ash, producing a material similar to clay. According to the National Science Foundation, 45 million tons of the ash become waste. That waste is often stored in large detention ponds and was the culprit in an environmental disaster in Kingston, Tenn., last December when a dike gave way and swamped 300 acres of land with a toxic ash mixture. Liu's technology has been licensed for production and commercial use by companies in 11 nations, including the United States, China and India. Liu hopes that in 10 years, half of all the bricks manufactured and used in the United States will be made with fly ash.
  • "Purpose Prize recognizes work of baby boomers"
    Los Angeles Times
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    Life doesn't stop once you turn 60. For some, that's when life begins. That's the message Civic Ventures is trying to convey with the Purpose Prize, an award that commemorates the work of baby boomers over 60 who are working to solve society's issues. Two Californians -- Judith Broder, 69, of Studio City and Marcy Adelman, 63, of San Francisco -- were among 10 award winners from across the nation. Broder, a retired psychiatrist, started The Soldier's Project, a network of licensed healthcare professionals who provide free and confidential unlimited therapy to service members and their families. Marcy Adelman started Open House, an organization that focuses on providing services for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender senior citizens. The organization trains healthcare providers across California in how to deal with the LGBT community and is partnering with the San Francisco mayor's office to build affordable housing for LGBT seniors.
  • Purpose Prize Blog Coverage

    October 26, 2009
    "Joel Kramer named Purpose Prize Fellow" - MinnPost.com

    "Hartsville's Harriot honored as 2009 Purpose Prize Fellow" - SCNOW.com

    "Rutherfordton man wins $100,000 for helping local farmers" - Mountain Xpress

    "2009 Purpose Prize Honors "Encore Career" Innovators" - Change.org

    "Congratulations, 2009 Purpose Prize Winners" - Science + Religion Today

    "$50,000 Purpose Prize winner reflects on his journey" - Today's Drum

    "Five Other Entrepreneurs Over 60 Win $50,000 Each for Using" - The Unruly Mob

    "…and the Purpose Prize Winners Are" - 2young2retire.com

    "Tim Will's $100K idea" - The Clog

    "Inventor of 'Green Bricks' Wants To Build Series of Underground Tubes" - Blogotariat (Popular Science)

    "2009 Purpose Prize winners announced by Civic Ventures" - Ecumen Changing Aging Blog

    "Mohican wins for wellbriety program" - Newspaper Rock

    "Five Social Innovators in Encore Careers Win $100,000 Purpose Prize. Five Other Entrepreneurs Over 60 Win $50,000 Each for Using Creativity, Experience to Solve Long-Standing Social Problems" - The Social Edge

    "Civic Ventures names social innovators who meld money & meaning" - WorkLife Nation

    "Civic Ventures Names New Purpose Prize Winners" - Skoll Foundation blog

    "The Purpose Prize Honors Doing Good After 60" - Tonic.com

    "Purpose Prize recognizes work of baby boomers (LA Times) - Best of Boomers

    "Timothy Will: 2009 Purpose Prize Winner" - The Savvy Shopper

    "Purpose Prize: Liz & Steve Alderman" - Tactical Philanthropy Advisors

    "Transform Your Business - 6 tenets to reflect on from Trappist monks" - Fuelnet.com

    "Choosing good work instead of good exits from work" - Shine

    "Judith Broder: 2009 Purpose Prize Winner" - The Day After an Inconvenient Truth

    "Introducing The Purpose Prize, winners 50-70+ years old" - Kitsune: The Fox Woman's Mirror

    "Purpose Prize 2009 Winner - Timothy Will" - Talking Eyes Media

  • "Springs man wins prize for Native American program"
    KJCT News (ABC)
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    A Colorado Springs group that helps Native Americans overcome alcoholism, drug abuse and other health issues has won a $100,000 prize from a San Francisco think tank. White Bison Inc. won a Purpose Prize from Civic Ventures. The prize recognizes innovators and initiatives solving community problems. White Bison's founder, Don Coyhis, says he'll use the money to expand the nonprofit group he founded in 1988 and launch an institute to promote wellness - or what he calls "Wellbriety" - among the nation's 564 tribes.
  • "Vets helped to conquer their despair"
    Los Angeles Daily News
    By Dana Bartholomew
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    In his three tours of duty in Iraq, Army Spc. Jason Shaw saw more than his share of blood and guts. He'd seen men blown out of Bradleys. He'd seen six friends die. And he'd carried a head full of anger and a soul racked by despair. But instead of seeking psychological help from the Veterans Administration, he went to The Soldiers Project - a Studio City-based network of licensed psychotherapists who give free mental health support to military members and their families. Judith Broder, 60, founded the Soldier's Project and has been named a 2009 Civic Ventures Purpose Prize winner for her work.
  • "Purpose Prize Winner Helps Farmers and Chefs Connect"
    AARP Bulletin
    By Elizabeth Pope
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    Three years ago, 2009 Purpose Prize winner Tim Will and his family abandoned the hectic pace of Miami for the bucolic beauty of Rutherfordton, N.C. in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. "I was going to teach and grow things on our farm," says Will, 61, a self described "corporate dude turned high school teacher. Will learned that Rutherford County had lost 75 percent of its textile and manufacturing jobs to globalization and lacked the high-tech infrastructure to create new businesses. Instead of teaching, Will jumped into a job leading a new nonprofit, Foothills Connect Business & Technology Center, charged with promoting small businesses and technology. In February 2007, Foothills Connect applied for a $1.4 million grant, and two years later the county had 100 miles of fiber-optic cables to bring broadband Internet to the rural county. Two months later, the nonprofit launched Farmers Fresh Market, an online ordering system linking small farmers with chefs and consumers.
  • Purpose Prize winner - Duncan Campbell
    KATU (ABC) News (Portland)
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    "One of our local three everyday heroes is being nationally recognized this morning for his outstanding charity work. Duncan Campbell is the executive director for Friends of the Children. He won a $50,000 Civic Ventures Purpose Prize for his work at the Friends of the Children organization. The Purpose Prize is a part of a program that engages millions of baby boomers in encore careers...combining social impact, personal meaning and continued income - in the second half of life."
  • Purpose Prize Winner - Don Coyhis
    KRDO (ABC) News
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    After a long battle with sliding revenues, big bucks from out of state for a Colorado Springs group.. White Bison Inc. has won a $100,000 prize Purpose Prize from San Francisco-based Civic Ventures for their work within the community. The nonprofit group - founded in 1988 - is dedicated to promoting wellness among the nation's 564 native tribes. it helps native americans overcome alcoholism, drug abuse and other health issues is getting a little out-of-state assistance.
  • Purpose Prize Winner - Don Coyhis
    KKTV News
    By Colorado Springs
    October 26, 2009
    Full article
    A Colorado Springs group that helps Native Americans overcome alcoholism, drug abuse, and other health issues has won a $100,000 Purpose Prize from the San Francisco think tank Civic Ventures. Don Coyhis is the founder of the group called White Bison, Inc. They're receiving the Purpose Prize, which recognizes innovators and initiatives solving community problems. Coyhis says he'll use the money to expand the non-profit and launch an institute to promote wellness among the nation's 564 tribes.
  • "Honors await those who turn tables after 60 "
    San Francisco Chronicle
    By Andrew S. Ross
    October 25, 2009
    Full article
    On Monday, 11 social innovators will learn that they have received awards of as much as $100,000 for work they're doing "in their encore careers solving big problems facing our communities and the world." Civic Ventures describes the prize as "a down payment on what these 60-plus innovators will do next." Earlier this year Civic Ventures launched an initiative called the Silicon Valley Encore Fellowship Progam, funded by Hewlett-Packard and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Ten retired Silicon Valley executives were each given $25,000, partially subsidized by their former employers, to work for six months to a year at Bay Area nonprofits that focus on education and the environment. "Internships for grown-ups," Freedman calls the organization's Encore program.
  • "Encore! Encore! And Journalism"
    The Atlantic
    By Peter Osnos
    October 20, 2009
    Full article
    Journalism's Great Depression has meant the loss of many thousands of jobs: 16,000 in 2008 alone, according to estimates cited by the Columbia Journalism Review. But there is another emerging strand to this narrative. The Columbia Journalism Review (where I am vice-chairman) has announced the first CJR Encore Fellows, four eminent journalists who will write for the magazine and cjr.org over the next nine months. The establishment of CJR Encore Fellows, with a grant from Atlantic Philanthropies, is an extension into journalism of a movement that has started to take hold in the past decade in other fields: education, medicine, law and most recently, in Silicon Valley. Under the charismatic leadership of Marc Freedman and his colleagues at Civic Ventures, baby boom professionals are being encouraged to reevaluate career objectives at what, until very recently, might have been their prelude to retirement with a goal of making contributions to society.
  • "Program Taps Retired Execs To Help Nonprofits"
    NPR
    By Rachael Myrow
    October 16, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    A Bay Area pilot project - Encore Fellowships - is playing matchmaker, pairing retired corporate big leaguers with nonprofits that could use their expertise. The program is about to be expanded with funding from the Serve America Act, which promotes volunteerism. Tech giant Hewlett-Packard paired with Civic Ventures to launch the Silicon Valley Encore Initiative, to help baby boomers nearing retirement to launch into "encore careers" - careers with social purpose. Encore Fellowships grew out of the partnership. Encore Fellow Leslye Louis retired from HP after 20 years and was eager to amp up her civic engagement. She and a fellow HP alum are now using their experience at Partners in School Innovation, a 30-employee, $3.5 million organization focused on ground-level reform at urban public schools.
  • "Two former Chicago Tribune staffers named Encore fellows"
    Chicago Tribune Tower Ticker News Blog
    By Phil Rosenthal
    October 15, 2009
    Full article
    Two former Chicago Tribune staff members - Lisa Anderson and Don Terry - have been named to the inaugural group of four in the Encore Fellowship for Journalists, a program to assist recently unemployed, seasoned reporters and editors, by Columbia Journalism Review. CJR's partners on the project are the Florida's Poynter Institute and Civic Ventures, which developed the Encore concept and created a pilot program that eased veteran Silicon Valley execs into the non-profit sector. With the newspaper industry downsizing, the Encore program will provide the opportunity to write for CJR and its Web site over a nine-month period beginning later this month. The fellows also get support and assistance aimed at preparing them to best make use of their experience in the coming years.
  • "Retirees can use career skills to volunteer"
    Chicago Tribune
    By Janet Kidd
    October 11, 2009
    Full article
    Retirees in their 50s and 60s are using volunteer as a gateway into meaningful encore work. Two years after taking an early retirement package from Hewlett-Packard, former marketing vice president Gina Cassinelli is working part time for a stipend on a marketing campaign for a program to boost academic achievement in low-income middle-school students. Cassinelli, 52, heard through a friend about the Silicon Valley Encore Initiative, a pilot program sponsored by her former employer that matches recent retirees with select non-profit groups. She says working on the campaign for schools has energized her as much as any of her jobs. Steve Mercer spent 35 years with General Electric and Boeing, . Now, through Experience Corps, he's developing the math skills of a fifth-grader.
  • "Abdullah backers feel 'betrayal, shame, disbelief' "
    The Globe and Mail
    By Gloria Galloway
    October 8, 2009
    Full article
    Purpose Prize winner Nasrine Gross was among those who worked optimistically to get Abdullah Abdullah elected this summer in Afghanistan. Abdullah was seen as the man with the best chance to unseat President Hamid Karzai. Gross, a Kabul-born professor and an Afghan-American woman's-rights activist, said the huge support signaled a real change. "It was if all of a sudden they (voters)had realized they had a real choice and floodgates had burst open," she said. But those same voters are now feeling betrayed after allegations of extensive election fraud. Karzai garnered nearly 55 percent of the votes in the Aug. 20 election over Abdullah's 28 percent. Officials are expecting the final election tallies, adjusted for the fraud, to be released by the independent Electoral Complaints Commission as early as Saturday.
  • "Conn honored as Alumnus of the Year"
    University of Louisville Alumni Magazine
    October 8, 2009
    Full article
    2008 Purpose Prize winner Jay P. Davidson was named a 2009 Alumni Fellow by the University of Louisville. Davidson is executive director of The Healing Place, a nationally recognized program, which helps people break free from homelessness, alcoholism and drug addiction. The 436-bed shelter provides a sobering-up center, emergency shelter and recovery program for homeless men, women and children. Davidson oversees finance and administration, fund development, public relations, facilities management, program administration of the recovery programs and supervision of the free health care clinic.
  • " Boomers Redefine Retirement With 'Encore' Careers"
    US News and World Report
    By Kerry Hannon
    October 8, 2009
    Full article
    Increasing numbers of people are using their retirement years to pursue a purpose, a passion, or a dream. They want to be engaged intellectually, give back, and find meaning in their own lives in a way they couldn't during their full-time career days. Between 5.3 million and 8.4 million Americans ages 44 to 70 have already launched encore careers, positions that combine income with personal meaning and social good, according to a 2008 survey commissioned by the MetLife Foundation and Civic Ventures. "Very few people start a career in retirement purely for the money," says Marc Freedman, founder and chief executive of Civic Ventures and author of Encore: Finding Work That Matters in the Second Half of Life. "They're swapping money for meaning. The old retirement dream was the freedom from work. The new, purpose-focused dream is the freedom to work."
  • "From Corporate To Nonprofit"
    KQED - The California Report
    By Rachel Myrow
    October 7, 2009
    Full article
    The Serve America Act which Congress passed earlier this year is intended to draw more Americans into public service. Tucked into that legislation is a commitment to expand a pilot program developed right here in California. The Silicon Valley Encore Initiative pairs retired corporate executives with nonprofits who could use their business expertise. Featured are Civic Ventures Encore Fellow Leslye Louis, along wtih nonprofit director Derek Mitchell, Yvonne Hunt from Hewlett Packard, and Karen Baker, California's Secretary of Service and Volunteering.
  • "Upside/Downside: The changing face of retirement"
    WCPN Ideastream (Cleveland)
    October 5, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    In this podcast, Civic Ventures CEO Marc Freedman talks to Eric Wellman about how boomers are changing what it means to be retired. For millions of baby boomers, their working lives have run their course after 20 or 30 years. They find themselves at a point where they're looking to transition into a new life phase. In this new phase, boomers are taking on work with meaning, in careers like the environment, health care, nonprofit work, and social services.
  • "Helping those in need, and laughing along the way"
    News & Record (Greensboro)
    By Nancy McLaughlin
    October 3, 2009
    Full article
    2008 Purpose Prize winners Rev. Nelson Johnson and his wife, Joyce Johnson, leaders in the faith community, are scheduled to receive the Marvin E. Johnson Diversity and Equity Award from the Association for Conflict Resolution this weekend. They were nominated for their organization of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission and their history of creating change through diverse aspects of restorative justice, according to the organization. The Johnsons are also being honored for bringing together the voices of labor, women's, civic, and religious to collectively work to improve the lives of the disenfranchised.
  • "Pursuing an 'Encore' Career"
    Fidelity Navigator
    September 28, 2009
    Full article
    Ed Speedling spent nearly 30 years working in the medical field, both as an academic and an executive. While he found his research and teaching fulfilling, he never forgot about a brief encounter he had as a young college student. On his way to a night class in 1961, Speedling emerged from a Manhattan subway station and was confronted by a middle-aged woman in a long, shabby gray coat who asked him for money because she was hungry. It was a powerful experience that he still recalled years later when, in his late 50s, he began working to improve the lives of the homeless. He now works with Project H.O.M.E. in Philadelphia, an organization that provides outreach services and tries to prevent homelessness. Speedling is just one of many people who, after spending years in one profession, have launched what has become known as an "encore career" devoted to community service.
  • "Smart Strategies for Retirees Seeking Work"
    Kiplinger's Retirement Report and Kiplinger Magazine
    By Kathryn Walson
    September 17, 2009
    Full article
    Retirees seeking work in today's recession battered economy have been finding it slow going. But there are ways to approach job seeking in a slow economy. Terry Nagel, managing editor or Encore.org at Civic Ventures suggests volunteering as an inroad to employment. "If you volunteer, you might find that's the way to get your foot in the door," Nagel says. Consulting or working part-time for a new or even former employer can be other ways to approach the job hunt. This article originally ran on 9?17/2009 in the Kiplinger's Retirement Report.
  • "A Troubling Timeline for a Certain Age Group"
    New York Times
    By Sarah Kershaw
    September 17, 2009
    Full article
    With the deaths this summer of boomers Senator Edward Kennedy, Walter Cronkite, Michael Jackson, Farrah Fawcett, Don Hewitt, and Patrick Swayze among others, this summercould come to be known as the summer when baby boomers began to turn to the obituary pages first, to face not merely their own mortality or ponder their legacies, but to witness the passing of legends who defined them as a tribe, bequeathing through music, culture, news and politics a kind of generational badge that has begun to fray. Marc Freedman, the founder of Civic Ventures, sees an opportunity in this collective recognition of loss and of the passage of time. Freedman is working on a book about what he is tentatively calling "Generation E," for encore, as in a second career, with people like Bill Gates, Bill Clinton and Al Gore as role models for the transition. "I think this is the first time so many have simultaneously had an awareness of death and the prospect of a whole new act," Mr. Freedman said. "Never before have there been so many people who have so much experience and the time left to do something with it."
  • "Retirement Revolution: The New Reality"
    PBS
    September 15, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    Paula Zahn hosts this 90-minute special focues on retirement and social issues. Eight topics are included, among them "encore careers." The encore career segment features Alice Williams, an Experience Corps member and Ruth Wooden, Civic Ventures board chair. Williams retired from her job as a computer operator after 29 years with a pension and Social Security. While working full time in her first career, Williams paid her way through NYU, earning a B.A. and a Master's Degree. Today as an Experience Corps volunteer, she's tutoring kids at John H. Finley Elementary School in New York City. Wooden is the Civic Ventures Volunteer Board Chair for Civic Ventures. She explains what draws people into encore careers that provide social good: "They've watched their community for 30, 40 years; they know where there are problems in the community. And they see that they have skills that they can bring to bear to address those problems."
  • "Recession pinches a community college's effort to help baby boomers"
    Chronicle of Philanthropy
    By Sandy Asirvatham
    September 10, 2009
    Full article
    Deborah Aguiar-Vélez, 53, realized she needed to figure out what to do with the next chapter of her life. After relocating to Charlotte, NC, she enrolled in Success to Significance, at Central Piedmont Community College's Lifelong Learning Institute. The program, one of several at community colleges nationwide for people at midlife preparing for new careers in health care, education, or the environmental or social-service arenas, was supported by a grant from Civic Ventures and the MetLife Foundation. Aguiar-Velez thrived in the program, determining that she wanted to help Hispanics achieve more visibility and recognition in American culture. But the recession bit hard in Charlotte, and the program is now on hold. Today the Lifelong Learning Institute has been offering free seminars to help jobless people handle the more immediate concern of finding employment, rather than the more long-term goal of switching careers.
  • "Workers seek jobs with impact"
    MarketWatch
    By Emily Glazer
    September 9, 2009
    Full article
    Now that the financial system has been rocked to its core, "social capital" is getting a lot of buzz. But what is it? It boils down to putting your efforts into jobs with a socially positive impact, connecting money with meaning and investing with those principles in mind. People of all ages are pursuing those mantras -- from twentysomethings seeking socially responsible jobs straight out of college to Gen X-ers in their 30s and 40s leaving highly paid posts in major corporations to launch socially aware start-ups to baby boomers investing or advising companies on how to be more socially aware. Marc Freedman of Civic Ventures points to a new hybrid of work forming, because of the necessity of longer working lives, combined with an urge to move toward work (with pay) with a pronounced social impact.
  • "For Encore Fellows, work is even better second time around"
    Silcon Valley/San Jose Business Journal
    By Elizabeth Kim
    September 7, 2009
    Full article
    Thanks to a pilot program that helps people transition from the corporate realm into nonprofit work, a number of Silicon Valley agencies are getting expert help they wouldn't have otherwise been able to afford. A joint venture of Hewlett-Packard, The Packard Foundation and Civic Ventures is providing nine Encore Fellows with a $25,000 stipend for either 12 months of part-time or six months of full-time employment. Among those fellows are Gina Cassinelli and John Armstrong. Cassinelli, after 20 years at HP, was matched with Citizen Schools - an after-school program for low-income students in Redwood City - to draft a comprehensive marketing plan. John Armstrong, a West Point grad, Peace Corps veteran, and HP employee, is now working with Palo Alto-based Environmental Volunteers, heading up a rebranding project.
  • "The Cruel Cost of Clunkers"
    Worldchanging (blog)
    By Suzi Boss
    September 2, 2009
    Full article
    Cash for Clunkers, the U.S. federal program that offered rebates to buyers of fuel-efficient cars, sputtered to a halt this week after burning through $3 billion in federal funding. The program wasn't without controversy, but it did clear the roads of an estimated 500,000 gas guzzlers. Meanwhile, thousands of low-income consumers pay dearly to keep their clunkers running so they can get to work and stay a step ahead of the bill collector. An innovative nonprofit called Bonnie CLAC has discovered that getting these families into reliable, fuel-efficient vehicles can improve everything from their job prospects to family eating habits to children's health. Robert Chambers started Bonnie CLAC to address the web of issues tied to affordable transportation for the working poor. His initiative has earned him the Purpose Prize, and generated a recent invitation to the White House to meet with President Obama for a summit on community solutions.
  • "Oh, to Be Young Again (for Real)"
    Money Magazine
    By Pat Regnier
    September 2009
    Full article
    For lots of boomers and Gen Xers, the recession has brought the old uncertainty roaring back. We already knew our jobs weren't lifetime deals, but now entire white-collar industries are shrinking or reorganizing. We're realizing we may need to make a really big change. The smart move would be to get past the fear and try to recapture the openness and energy of youth. But it's not so simple. Marc Freedman of Civic Ventures says society isn't yet set up for people to go through start-up mode twice. It's still too hard for mid-career people to go back to school or to maintain health coverage between jobs. Herminia Ibarra of the Insead business school says not to expect a quick path from dead end job A to dream job B; better to plan for false starts, a long learning curve, and volunteering, or consulting gigs.
  • "At Your Service"
    Harvard Magazine
    By Nell Porter Brown
    September 2009
    Full article
    A renewed national push through the Obama administration's United We Stand initiative and the funding of the Hatch-Kennedy Serve America Act could start to boost overall volunteer rates, which had begun a decline in recent years. Boomers seem particularly ready to meet the challenge. And nonprofits and the volunteer system are starting to shift to meet boomers' requirements. Many boomers are well educated, with successful careers and choosy about how they want to invest their time. Used to being engaged at a high level, they want to make an impact. Civic Ventures is a novel organization that specifically targets baby boomers who want to put their abilities to good use in the second half of life. Its Encore Fellowships generally offer paid, one-year leadership positions with nonprofit and public-sector organizations to foster volunteers' transitions to new post-mid-life service careers.
  • "Books for All Seasons"
    WSJ Blog - Financial Advisor
    By Kevin Noblet
    August 28, 2009
    Full article
    For financial advisers, certain books are timeless. Kristen McNamara, who writes about practice management for Dow Jones Newswires, asked some of them about the books they recommend to clients at different life stages. Among them was, Encore: Finding Work that Matters in the Second Half of Life by Marc Freedman of Civic Ventures.
  • "Planning to Work After Retirement?"
    FOX2 News, St. Louis
    By Humberto and Georgina Cruz
    August 24, 2009
    Full article
    Columnists Humberto and Georgina Cruz offer book recommendations about the outdated notion of retirement as one long last vacation before we die. The new idea with momentum is work post retirement. First among their suggestions is, Encore: Finding Work That Matters in the Second Half of Life. From appeals lawyer to community pastor, health care executive to advocate for the homeless, truant officer to critical-care nurse, Freedman fills the book with encore stories of people who found work that mattered in their second half of life. By 2030, he foresees Boomers will provide the "backbone of education, health care, nonprofits, the government and other sectors" essential to our national well-being. * This column also ran in the Baltimore Sun, Orlando Sentinel, Hartford Courant, and several other Tribune Media sites.
  • "Rio Salado program to help Boomers transition to teaching"
    Arizona Republic
    By Lesley Wright
    August 4, 2009
    Full article
    Rio Salado College is launching a new program for people who are at least 50 years old and want to make the transition to a career in education. Civic Ventures and the MetLife Foundation awarded Rio a $25,000 grant to make the school's teacher-prep program Boomer friendly. Civic Ventures and MetLife founded the program after learning from a 2008 survey that re-careering is of interest to about half the population age 44 to 70. And teaching or otherwise working with youths topped the chart of new ventures. Marc Freedman, chief executive of Civic Ventures, said that community colleges will play a key role in helping Boomers reach their new career goals, partly because they cost less than universities or four-year colleges.
  • "Press ReStart on Your Career"
    CNN Money
    By Walecia Konrad
    July 29, 2009
    Full article
    If you've been off the full-time track for a while, nabbing a job in today's battered job market is no easy matter. But here are some tips that can help. Two major factors should dictate your approach to the job search: the kind of job you want, and the financial benefits you hope to gain. To narrow down the possibilities, think about the hours you're willing to work and the schedule that various jobs would require. And take into account where you have the best shot at getting an offer. Right now government, health care, and education are the areas most likely to be hiring, says Terry Nagel, editor of Encore.org, a resource created by Civic Ventures for people seeking second careers.
  • "On Becoming an Encore Worker"
    Salon
    By Nina B
    July 25, 2009
    Full article
    Both the author and her husband have become part of a new wave of Encore Workers, and both found those gigs at a university. He is now bringing business methods to academic R and D, and she in a campus lab doing brain science. Both are boomers extending their careers with new kinds of employment. Typically, an encore position entails enticing a retiree back into the workforce while gaining the added skills of a veteran worker. But in practical terms, you don't need to be past your 50s. You just need a good chunk of flexible time and a well-seasoned resume with skills that are relevant to the employer.To learn more about more active players in this new wave of later life employment, check out civicventures.org and encore.org.
  • "Job, career sites for workers over 50"
    Arizona Central.com
    July 22, 2009
    Full article
    Changing jobs and changing careers has become increasingly commonplace, reflecting increased turnover in the workplace due to the recession and the aging of baby boomers. But there are a myriad of online resources available for older workers who are considering new jobs because they've been downsized or because they're ready for new careers. Encore.org provides news, resources and connections for individuals and organizations establishing "encore careers" designed to combine social contribution, personal meaning and financial security. Many of the jobs posted are in education, health care and human services.
  • "Encore careers: Purpose, passion and a paycheck"
    San Diego News Network
    By Kim Brauer
    July 20, 2009
    Full article
    "Retirement as we know it is in the midst of being displaced as the central institution of the second half of life," says Marc Freedman, author of the book Encore: Finding Work that Matters in the Second Half of Life, and co-founder of Civic Ventures. As boomers near retirement age, more and more are opting for what Freedman has termed encore careers - taking or creating jobs that combine a paycheck with a sense of renewed energy and purpose. Joe Shapiro, dean of San Diego State University's College of Extended Studies, says the school is seeing a clear uptick among older students looking to forge encore careers.
  • "Volunteerism plays a valuable role in the community"
    Daily Breeze.com
    By Columnist Helen Dennis
    July 15, 2009
    Full article
    The concept of volunteerism has expanded with new terminology, programs, legislation and recognition. Boomers are playing a role in elevating volunteering in later life. The first of 77 million boomers turned 60 in 2006; the oldest is now 63. The boom generation is redefining the meaning of retirement. Large numbers want to engage in work, paid and unpaid, that makes a difference to others. Many want second careers that combine aspects of work, such as income and health benefits, with good services. The term and movement "encore careers" describes this new hybrid of volunteering with income, and was coined by Marc Freedman of Civic Ventures. Civic Ventures is a San Francisco-based nonprofit organization that has fostered and ignited civic engagement.
  • "Free CCAC program retrains older workers"
    Trib Live.com (Pittsburg)
    By Michael Aubele
    July 15, 2009
    Full article
    Community College of Allegheny County is using a $25,000 grant to offer a pilot program to train unemployed people older than 50 to become medical office assistants. The program begins this fall and is being funded by a competitive grant from MetLife Foundation and Civic Ventures. The grant will allow the college to waive tuition for students 50 or older who live in the county and meet certain criteria, including being without a job because of a layoff.
  • "Making the leap"
    Journal Sentinel
    By Stanley A. Miller
    July 11, 2009
    Full article
    Greg Ryan and Brooke Maroldi are on a mission to discover and document people who have made enormous changes in their lives by changing careers. The husband and wife team hope to inspire others by posting 15-minute video vignettes and slide shows online. The project, titled "Our Next Thing," seems significantly relevant in a tough economy and a job market that has many people pondering a Plan B. Millions of Americans have launched "encore careers" - jobs taken later in life that combine making a living with finding personal meaning and having a positive impact on society, according to a June 2008 survey by the MetLife Foundation and Civic Ventures.
  • "GRCC wins grant to retrain baby boomers in health care professions"
    Grand Rapids Press
    By Dave Murray
    July 6, 2009
    Full article
    People older than 50 looking for jobs could pick up skills that might lead to employment on the city's Medical Mile as part of a new Grand Rapids Community College program. The college has been awarded a $25,000 grant from Civic Ventures and the MetLife Foundation to help displaced baby boomers get medical training for new careers, and is reinforcing the value of older workers within the medical field. The hope is that once the economy improves, the growing hospitals in and around Grand Rapids could provide second careers for people who lost jobs in other fields. GRCC plans to team with Manpower Employment Services, the Area Agency on Aging of Western Michigan, Michigan Works! Agencies, and area health care employers for the pilot program.
  • "Ask an Expert: Boomers are a once in a lifetime opportunity"
    USA Today
    By Steve Strauss
    July 6, 2009
    Full article
    In Strauss' "Ask an Expert" column, Strauss argues that the sheer number of boomers makes them a force to be reckoned with. Historically, they've been at the forefront of a variety of important issues and events: Vietnam, the sexual revolution, civil rights, the self-awareness movement of the '70s and the health craze of the '80s. These are people who will always see themselves as open-minded and young. Willing to try out new ideas, the Boomers are a creative entrepreneur's dream. And they're just the sort of people primed (even more so with the market's battering) for encore careers.
  • "Food Bank: Meet White House"
    San Francisco Examiner
    July 1, 2009
    Full article
    The San Francisco Food Bank saw one of its own honored at the White House Tuesday. Purpose Prize winner Gary Maxworthy, who has worked with the food bank for 15 years, was honored by President Obama for developing the Farm to Family program. The D.C. event marked the launch of a $50 million fund for social innovation projects communities across the country. The Farm to Family program finds and gives unmarketable fruits and vegetables to food banks across the state. Maxworthy drew on 30 years of experience in the food brokerage industry to connect California food growers and packers directly to food banks to ensure the produce goes to feed the hungry.
  • "Nurses for Newborns' Rohrbach goes to White House"
    St. Louis Business Journal
    By Kelsey Volkmann
    July 1, 2009
    Full article
    Purpose Prize winner Sharon Rohrbach thought that an email inviting her to the White House -- and requesting her social security number -- was a scam. Instead it was a real invitation to the White House to witness President Obama acknowledge outstanding social innvators. A longtime neonatal nurse, Rohrbach watched too many newborns leave the hospital, only to return with life-threatening medical conditions. So she founded Nurses for Newborns to bring experienced nurses into the homes of mothers whose socioeconomic, personal or health status put their infants at high risk. Nurses provide free medical care, parenting education, injury prevention strategies and emotional support for families with children under age 2.
  • "Nurses for Newborns founder invited to White House conference"
    St. Louis Dispatch
    By Deb Peterson
    June 30, 2009
    Full article
    2007 Purpose Prize winner Sharon Rohrbach, founder and former CEO of the Nurses for Newborns, was attended a White House conference Rohrbach highlighting effective non-profit organizations. Nurses for Newborns is fits that description; its annual budget hovers around $3.6 million for more than 50 nurses who make monthly and sometimes weekly visits to teach parents how to care for their babies and to watch for signs of illness. The service, which is designed to help prevent infant mortality, abuse and neglect, is free to the families. The agency's funding includes money from the state, grants and private contributions.
  • "Obama pledges support for social innovators"
    Associated Press
    June 30, 2009
    President Barack Obama promised that the White House will do its part to support grassroots organizations that are successful in their efforts to improve communities. Obama noted that the community service act he signed into law contained a $50 million innovation fund that he wanted to use to provide aid to the most promising nonprofits in the country. Obama also called on foundations, businesses and philanthropists to take an active role, saying they would require matching investments from the private sector. Among the nonprofits invited to the event were Bonnie CLAC, a New Hampshire organization founded by Purpose Prize winner Robert Chambers that helps struggling people acquire fuel-efficient, affordable and reliable vehicles.
  • "Obama praises nonprofit, including N.H. group"
    Boston Globe
    By Fonn Rhee
    June 30, 2009
    Full article
    President Obama praised the New Hampshire-based nonprofit Bonnie CLAC, founded by Purpose Prize winner Robert Chambers, in a press conference honoring innovative nonprofits across the country. Such groups, Obama said, hold the promise of finding solutions to persistent problems and to meeting unprecedented challenges because government can't do everything. Bonnie CLAC helps poor people buy fuel-efficient reliable cars by building their credit records and offering advice on selecting and buying vehicles. Chambers came up with the idea for the group after working at an auto dealership and seeing low-income individuals forced to pay high interest rates when they purchased cars. Bonnie CLAC has guaranteed more than $12 million in loans for more than 1,200 clients. President Obama's full remarks are included.
  • "White House to Spotlight Innovative Nonprofit Groups"
    Chronicle of Philanthropy
    June 30, 2009
    Full article
    A select four nonprofit groups will discuss the way they are tackling social problems at a White House event today that will include remarks by President Obama. The president will discuss the importance of searching outside Washington to find and expand successful community solutions, and challenge foundations and philanthropists to join in this effort. Among those invited to speak in Purpose Prize winner Robert Chambers, the founded of the nonprofit Bonnie CLAC, which provides low-interest car loans and financial-literacy training to low-income buyers. Five other Civic Ventures Purpose Prize winners were invited to the event as well.
  • "Obama honors local innovators"
    ABC News
    June 30, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    President Obama honored a group of non-profit innovators, including some from the Bay Area, working to solve the nation's toughest social problems. The event marked the launch of the president's $50 million Social Innovation Fund to help non-profits find new ways to make a difference. Among those honored was Purpose Prize winner Gary Maxworthy, who created the San Francisco Food Bank's Farm to Family Program. It connects California food growers and packers to local food banks.
  • "Rebuilding the Economy - Rise of the 40-something intern"
    Christian Science Monitor
    By Amy Farnsworth
    June 26, 2009
    Full article
    Perhaps it's a sign of the times. The internship role, once reserved for college students and entry-level candidates, is attracting mid-career professionals eager to retool their skills. With 7 million jobs lost since the beginning of the recession, internships are becoming a sought-after way to reenter the job market. Nonprofits are also offering internships to mid-career professionals, among them: Sightline Institute, a think tank in Seattle; Earthwatch Institute, an international nonprofit group with US offices in Maynard, Mass.; and the Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum in Washington, D.C. Training programs are also gaining momentum. Civic Ventures spearheaded an Encore Fellows pilot program in 2008 for experienced technology sector employees ages 50 and up. The goal is to train them for management positions in the nonprofit world.
  • "Foundation founder honored for scholarships"
    San Francisco Chronicle
    By Jonathan Curiel
    June 17, 2009
    Full article
    2008 Purpose Prize winnder Catalino Tapia, whose Bay Area Gardener's Foundation has given scores of college scholarships to needy Bay Area students, was honored as a winner of the national Jefferson Award for Public Service - along with Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., and 10 select others. Previous recipients, which its organizers established in 1972 as "a Nobel Prize for public and community service," include Cesar Chavez, Ralph Nader, Jimmy Carter, Condoleezza Rice, Colin Powell, Paul Newman, Oprah Winfrey, Walter Cronkite and Steve Jobs. Tapia, a Mexican immigrant who came to the Bay Area four decades ago with just a few dollars in hand, started the Bay Area Gardener's Foundation seven years ago, using donations from clients, local businesses and fundraising dinners to create scholarships, which to date have been given to 31 students.
  • "The audacity of baby boomers"
    The News Journal (Deleware)
    By Beth Miller
    June 14, 2009
    Full article
    The dicey economy is reshaping the plans of many of the nation's 78 million boomers. Some have lost jobs and benefits, some have seen pay cuts, others simply wonder what will happen next. These transitions are coming at a time when jobs are hard to come by, housing values have fallen sharply, health care costs continue to rise, and the retirement accounts many depended on have lost trillions. But the long term outlook for older workers is good. Advisers, consultants and assorted networks have sprung up to offer assistance, camaraderie, and other connections as boomers reinvent their lives and careers. Civic Ventures spawned Philadelphia-based Coming of Age, which aims to inspire baby boomers to make a difference and works with organizations to help them adjust to this different demographic. "Even if the economy had remained sweet, people were planning to retire differently," said Bill Goldberg, executive director for Coming of Age. "They are an incredible untapped resource. We haven't begun to see what they can contribute to change in their communities. What we do is help them figure out their next steps, help them connect and contribute."
  • "Seniors as Entrepreneurs: Their Time Has Come"
    Business Week
    By Stacy Perman
    June 8, 2009
    Full article
    A combination of economic volatility as well as the growing number of baby boomers with time, energy, and money on their hands has redefined the starting age for new startups and has led to a surge in older entrepreneurs. In 2006, Civic Ventures launched the Purpose Prize. That first year, Marc Freedman, the organization's founder and CEO, says Civic Ventures worried there wouldn't be enough quality applicants to award five winners. In fact, they were deluged with more than 1,500 nominations. One of the 2007 winners was H. Eugene Jones, a former World War II bomber pilot who launched his first business in 1999, when he was 84. Jones devised Opening Minds through the Arts, a program that integrates art education into the core curriculum for at-risk kindergarten through eighth grade children. Says Jones, "You sit on a shelf waiting for the billions of years that this earth has been in existence, and you have your turn on stage for a nanosecond. To waste it by doing nothing is unthinkable."
  • "A boom in encore careers"
    Boston Globe
    By Irene Sage
    June 1, 2009
    Full article
    A new buzzword has emerged - encore careers. A number of vehicles are emerging to help boomers and their elders make the transition to second careers in nonprofit organizations or public service. The Serve America Act signed into law this spring aims to fill at least 10 percent of AmeriCorps openings with people 55 and older and establishes Encore Fellowships that place people 55 and older in management positions in nonprofits. The federal program is modeled in part on the Encore Fellowship program launched in Silicon Valley in January by Civic Ventures. Fellows receive $25,000 to work part time for a year - or six months full time - in nonprofits. "What we're seeing emerge is a kind of hybrid of practical idealism that is an integration of the spirit of service that has long animated people in later life and the practicality of continued income and benefits," says Civic Ventures founder Marc Freedman. "In the past people had to cobble together these opportunities. Now there's a more aggressive attempt to meet people who want to do this work halfway."
  • "Rethinking Retirement - Can Americans Afford to Retire?"
    CQ Researcher
    By Tom Billitteri
    June 2009
    Steep investment losses, insufficient savings, an entrenched recession, climbing health care costs, and rounds of lay offs --- all these factors are changing the reality of retirement for older Americans. Most will now need to continue working past the traditional retirement age to keep afloat. The timing is right for Encore Careers. The chance to combine social purpose, continued income, and meaningful work is attracting increasing numbers of boomers. The newly enacted Edward. M Kennedy Serve America Act authorizes as much as $6 billion in new spending over the next five years to increase volunteerism and community service to broaden the appeal of encore careers.
  • "Focus: From career to community work"
    Financial Times
    By Lauren Foster
    May 27, 2009
    Full article
    Leslye Louie, 48, had her first taste of working in the public sector when she was just out of university. But her career ended up taking a very different path. After earning an MBA, Ms Louie joined Hewlett-Packard in 1986 as a financial analyst and stayed there 19 years, rising to the position of vice-president of marketing in the global printing supplies business, a multibillion-dollar division. Last year Louie was named a Civic Ventures Encore Fellow. The fellowships are designed to help people who have finished, or are nearing the end of, their primary careers formally to move into the non-profit sector. In January, Ms Louie started an internship at Partners in School Innovation, a San Francisco non-profit that aims to improve literacy in low-income elementary schools.
  • Aging Well -- Encore Careers
    KQED - Health Dialogues
    By Rachael Myrow
    May 21, 2009
    Audio / Transcript
    Rachael Myrow reports on encore careers. Civic Ventures Marc Freedman is interviewed and says Americans need to realize what an extraordinary talent pool exists in the aging population. "We've mostly thought about the aging society as a problem to be solved, but we really believe it's every bit as much an opportunity to be seized," he said. Purpose Prize winner Chia Chia Chien, 62, is profiled as well. Chien, a former social worker, is the founder of the Culture to Culture Foundation.
  • "Internships for Elders"
    US News and World Report
    By Emily Brandon
    May 18, 2009
    Full article
    An internship has long been a milestone for college students and recent graduates looking to get experience and make contacts. But laid-off or job-hopping baby boomers are also taking these low or unpaid positions to transition into new gigs. Nigel Ball, 51, put in 26 years as a marketing executive at Hewlett Packard. Ball knew he wanted to shift into a second career in the nonprofit world, but initially had trouble getting hired. The answer came through a Silicon Valley Encore Fellowship, a new program that offers a $25,000 stipend to experienced retired employees interested in six- or 12-month assignments at nonprofits focused on education and environmental improvement. After only five months with Resource Area for Teaching, an organization that provides support to San Francisco Bay Area teachers, Ball was hired as RAFT's executive director of marketing.
  • "Life Out of Death"
    Wall Street Journal
    By Glenn Ruffenach
    May 16, 2009
    Full article
    Former teachers Arlene and Jack Lociceros are two of the founding members of Transplant Speakers International Inc., a N.J-based nonprofit whose mission is to make organ and tissue donation the norm rather than the exception in the U.S. and beyond. The Lociceros lost their 27-year old daughter Amy in 1993; her organs helped save four lives. The Lociceros are part of a small but growing movement within the ranks of older Americans: individuals who go beyond traditional volunteering to create organizations that are tackling some of society's most pressing needs. There's a "potential windfall of talent" among older adults, says Marc Freedman, chief executive officer of Civic Ventures. With decades of experience to call upon, they bring "entirely new approaches to solving seemingly intractable problems."
  • The Next American Dream --- "Putting a new value on the golden years"
    Marketplace (NPR)
    By Sam Eaton
    May 9, 2009
    Full article
    One of the essentials of the traditional American Dream has been a financially secure retirement in your 60s. Well, chalk that up as another victim of the recession. Unlike the Depression Era generation, the 78 million boomers now reaching their 60s didn't save. And that's forcing some to rethink what it means to retire. Former Southern California real estate agent Meridith McKenzie, 56, now works at a nonprofit that pays less than half of her former earnings. As a program manager at the Arroyo Seco Foundation in Pasadena, she's heading up efforts to restore an industrial stretch of river to its former glory. Civic Ventures' founder Marc Freedman says McKenzie is at the forefront of a new trend that could redefine retirement.
  • "Being the Change"
    Chronicle of Philanthropy
    By Suzanne Perry
    May 7, 2009
    Full article
    When President Obama signed into law a sweeping national-service bill last month, few savored it more than Alan Khazei.As head of a nonprofit group he founded in 2007, Be the Change, Mr. Khazei had worked relentlessly for more than a year to help put together a broad coalition to press for the law. "He's a human hurricane," says John Gomperts, president of Civic Ventures, a group that promotes public-service and nonprofit jobs for older people. "Nothing is impossible to Alan."
  • "Looking for Heroes? Many of Them Are in the AARP Generation"
    Washington Post
    By Abigail Trafford
    April 21, 2009
    Full article
    Though President Obama may be intent of galvanizing young people to embrace political activism and to break ground on global issues, a whole lot of those at the forefront are actually more of the AARP generation. Consider heroes 53-year old Richard Phillips, captain of the Maersk Alabama, who defied the Somali pirates; and 58-year old Chesley B. "Sully" Sullenberger, the US Airways pilot who landed his plane in the icy Hudson River, saving all passengers and crew. Civic Ventures has tapped into the realization that older adults may be the best equipped to to break old barriers and build new understandings for the future. The organization awards Purpose Prizes each hear to men and women older than 60 who have helped solve social problems, from resettling refugees from Iraq and Somalia in Fargo, N.D., to cutting the recidivism rate among young offenders in New York.
  • "Federal legislation creates fellowships for encore careers"
    Charlestown Daily Mail
    By Evadna Bartlett
    April 21, 2009
    Full article
    The language of retirement years is changing, and the federal government wants to be a part of it. Rather than slide into retirement as we once knew it, baby boomers are launching encore careers, according to a survey by MetLife Foundation and Civic Ventures. The 2008 survey of more than 3,500 people ages 44 to 70 estimated that 5.3 million to 8.4 million Americans already are in their encore careers with a focus tending to be jobs in education, health and nonprofits. Congress was convinced that the federal government should join in, and created Encore Fellowships in the recently passed Serve America Act. "The federal legislation recognizes a new stage of life and work," Civic Ventures President John Gomperts said. "People in this stage of life need bridges and pathways to get from one stage to the next.Given the problems in our nation right now, we can't afford to waste their experience."
  • "Internships for boomers"
    Times Union
    By John Gomperts
    April 21, 2009
    Full article
    National service isn't just for kids anymore. The bipartisan Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act, which President Barack Obama will sign today, is the most inclusive and comprehensive national service legislation in our history. With this law in place, federal policy will, for the first time, make national service accessible and inviting for millions who have finished their midlife careers. The Serve America Act recognizes how tough that midlife career transition is by creating a dazzling policy innovation something akin to internships for boomers. These "encore fellowships" will provide people 55 and older access to one-year management or leadership positions that will prepare them for jobs in the public and nonprofit sectors. **** this news piece also ran in the Albany Times-Union, and the Desert News (Salt Lake City)
  • "A new wave of service"
    San Francisco Chronicle - Open Forum
    By Marc Freedman
    April 20, 2009
    Full article
    All over the country, volunteering is up as laid-off workers and others coming out of retirement flock to nonprofit organizations to stay engaged while looking for new jobs. A recent national survey commissioned by MetLife Foundation and Civic Ventures uncovered a longer-term trend, underway before the worst of the downturn hit. Last year fully half told researchers they want to shift into careers in the social sector - not as a way station but as a destination. The movement will get a big boost tomorrow when President Obama is scheduled to sign the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act, dramatically expanding opportunities for Americans of all ages to serve. The law will also establish Encore Fellowships nationally, creating an important new bridge to help Boomers make the often arduous transition from the end of midlife careers to encore careers in public service.
  • "Stretch Your Nest Egg: The Second Career"
    Smart Money (cover story)
    By Angie C. Marek
    April 20, 2009
    Full article
    With at least 12 million Americans searching for work, landing meaningful (or even paid) employment in a new industry is getting a lot harder for the graying set. Since switching careers often means a pay cut, staying within the industry where they made their name often makes sense for retirees. That might sound bleak, but experts point out that someone can stay in a familiar field while still getting a change of scenery, and maybe even more interesting responsibilities. Marc Freedman, CEO of Civic Ventures, says job hunters should remind recruiters "they basically have years of training that someone else has paid for." Analysts estimate that over the next decade, nonprofits will need hundreds of thousands of manager-level employees with expertise in disciplines like marketing or finance. Health care and education tend to be good recession-proof bets as well.
  • "AARP.org Earth Works: Why Mature Activism May Save the Planet"
    AARP bulletin
    By Rob Gurwitt
    April 20, 2009
    Full article
    All over the country, women and men in their 50s, 60s, 70s and beyond are plunging into environmental activism in ways that are redefining the term. Not content simply to join environmental groups or write letters or lobby or stand around holding placards, they are taking the lead in getting results they can see: in local carbon footprints and in their communities' consumption habits. Among them are Purpose Prize winners 62-year-old Joe James and 66-year old Reverend Canon Sally Bingham. James' Greening of Black America initiative in South Carolina is aimed at helping African American farmers find ways of selling their products locally, grow biofuels, and in other ways hook into the green economy. Reverend Bingham's Interfaith Power and Light campaign began as a coalition of Episcopal churches around San Francisco purchasing renewable energy, and has expanded to working with congregations around the country. *** this piece notes the findings of the Civic Ventures MetLife Encore Careers survey
  • "Encore Careers" - an interview with Marc Freedman
    KQED - Humankind
    April 19, 2009
    Full article
    Civic Ventures founder Marc Freedman talks about encore careers in this radio program. Describing the encore career impulse, Freedman says, "I think of it as a kind of practical idealism. Something that combines the need that so many people have for continued income and health benefits beyond what retirement age was in the past, and the spirit of service. What previous generations might have carried out through volunteerism, more and more people are looking for through jobs that combine income and meaning, and use their experience in ways that have a real social impact, that matter. That are not only personally meaningful, but that mean something beyond themselves."
  • "Savvy Schools"
    Wall Street Journal
    By Kelley Greene
    April 17, 2009
    Full article
    The humble community college is turning out to be one of the best resources for older adults seeking new directions -- and new jobs -- in later life. From coast to coast, two-year public institutions are streamlining existing training programs and designing new ones to help people approaching retirement or facing midlife layoffs. Among the programs created so far: vocational counseling, accelerated certification in health and education specialties, and help with small-business start-ups. Judy Goggin directs Civic Ventures' Community College Encore Career Program, which is funded by the MetLife Foundation. "With traditional four-year colleges, it's, 'Come and do what we've got,'" Ms. Goggin says. "At community colleges, the tuition is lower, they're more accessible, and they are adapting to where the jobs really are."
  • "Saving Up for Career No. 2"
    Business Week
    By Chris Farrell
    April 9, 2009
    Full article
    Against the backdrop of longer lifespans and a premium on brains over brawn, more employees are realizing that, in the long run, moving from a high-paying job they don't like to a lower-paying job they enjoy may entail less of a financial hit than they thought. The key is that the lower-paying job may allow you to work longer than if you'd stayed in the more lucrative career, so over time the blow to earnings lessens. And those "extra" years of income allow a portfolio to compound much longer before it's tapped. Savings become a way to gain the flexibility to eventually reshape your career - it's what funds career shifts throughout life. "The new goal is to have sufficient assets to liberate yourself to work," says Marc Freedman, head of Civic Ventures, a nonprofit that encourages baby boomers to launch new careers. "You save not to have freedom from work, but freedom to do the work you want."
  • "Skills to Learn to Restart Earnings "
    New York Times - Retirement section
    By John Leland
    April 2, 2009
    Full article
    Increasing numbers of retiring workers who can't afford to stop working are turning to community colleges to retool for new careers. The impact of the economic and stock market declines on retirees and workers about to retire has been especially pronounced. Unlike some younger workers, they typically need to re-enter the work force more quickly. Community colleges often offer focused and practical coursework well below the cost of tuition at a university. Many classes are offered in teaching and the health sciences to meet pressing employment needs. Civic Ventures' grantee community colleges Portland Community College and the Virginia Community College (and its Career Switcher Program) are among those described.
  • "Law Opens Up 'Encore' Careers "
    Wall Street Journal
    By Kelly Greene
    April 2, 2009
    Full article
    The deep recession is forcing millions of Americans in their 50s and 60s to rethink plans for retirement. That shift -- coupled with new legislation out of Washington -- could help spur a commitment to national service not seen since the early days of the Peace Corps. Older adults have steered clear, for the most part, of establishing second careers in the nonprofit world or fields like teaching or nursing. But now many older adults need to respond to financial losses, and nonprofits need more manpower. The two groups may now find common ground. The catalyst is the Edward M. Kennedy National Service Act. The bill is designed to encourage more Americans to commit to national service and expand opportunities for them to do so. To start, the legislation would expand nationwide a pilot project from Civic Ventures called Encore Fellows. This yearlong program is designed to help people who have finished, or are nearing the end of, their primary careers formally move into the nonprofit sector.
  • "A Move to Expand Volunteer Ranks"
    New York Times - Retirement section
    By Elizabeth Pope
    April 1, 2009
    Full article
    Older Americans who want to help solve the nation's social problems will soon have even more opportunities to do so. Last month, Congress passed the Senator Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act, which expands national and community service programs and includes provisions to attract adults over 55 to paid and volunteer jobs. John Gomperts, president of Civic Ventures says the legislation represents "an attitudinal shift in Congress - an important recognition that national service isn't just for the young." The legislation, estimated to cost about $6 billion over five years, will increase to 250,000 from 75,000 the number of volunteer positions that AmeriCorps can administer. The bill also creates four new service corps under the umbrella of AmeriCorps, specializing in health care, clean energy, fighting poverty and support for veterans.
  • "3 Industries Currently Hiring Older Workers"
    US World News and Report
    By Emily Brandon
    March 23, 2009
    Full article
    It's difficult, but not impossible for people over 50 to find new jobs. The unemployment rate for those age 55 and older rose to 5.9 percent in January 2009, but the construction, manufacturing, and hospitality industries were hit the hardest. Other job sectors - namely education, health care and government - are doing some hiring. A sluggish economy presents a great opportunity to head to the nearest college and pick up a teaching credential. "Math and science teachers and special education teachers are going to be in considerable demand," says Marc Freedman, founder of Civic Ventures. "This is a good window for upgrading skills and going back to school and doing internships and volunteering -- doing things that will make finding a job easier when the market gets more promising."
  • "The benefits of working longer"
    Boston Globe
    By Ellen Goodman
    March 20, 2009
    Full article
    The financial downturn may have come with the seeds of generational conflict over jobs, but it also carries packets of social change. There is a chance for the boomer generation to make a virtue - or a revolution - out of the necessity of working longer. We already know that a growing corps of people in their 50s and 60s are more interested in renewal than retirement, and are interested in work with social purpose especially. Says Marc Freedman of Civic Ventures, "The one benefit of this economic crisis is to drive home the reality that longer working lives are going to be necessary and desirable. If we can give people a sense that contributing longer is not another set of years at the grindstone but an opportunity to do something they can feel proud of, we'll have accomplished something significant." ***this article was published in the Boston Globe, Seattle Times, Balto Sun, St. Louis Post Dispatch, Charlotte Observor, San Jose Mercury News, Pittsburg Post-Gazette, Arizona Daily Star, and many other places.
  • "Going Back to Work in Your Golden Years"
    Smart Money
    By Lisa Scherzer
    March 20, 2009
    Full article
    Many 60-somethings are getting hit with a cold, hard reality: Their evaporated investment portfolios mean the golden years of retirement are getting further out of reach. The market's downturn has taken such a toll that many retirees are now dusting off their resumes and trying to find work. Industries that are holding up in the downturn include education and the government. Search for full- and part-time jobs available in your area on the many sites that cater to older workers. Among those that offer listings and advice are Workforce50.com, RetirementJobs.com, and Encore.org.
  • "Downturn leads to longer work life for boomers"
    Orange County Register
    By Jane Glenn Haas
    February 17, 2009
    Full article
    It wasn't supposed to end this way. For baby boomers trickling toward retirement, these were going to be the golden years. Some thought they would segue into volunteer or more purposeful work; others weren't planning on working at all. But the economy has changed all that, causing heightened anxiety throughout the population. "I tell older workers this is not a good time to quit your job," says Marc Freedman, head of the non-profit Civic Ventures. Instead, think about volunteering or doing some retraining for new sectors like health care, education, or the federal government. "We're telling people in the long run, the prospect of working in these fields and the non-profit field still looks promising," Freedman says.
  • "Can Volunteers Be a Lifeline for Nonprofit Groups?"
    New York Times
    By Kelley Holland
    January 25, 2009
    Full article
    Public funding and charitable donations have plummeted even as demand for nonprofits' services - especially for things like food and housing assistance - has risen sharply. But the good news is that the current economy is also creating potential opportunities for nonprofits. More than two million people lost jobs in 2008, and many talented and experienced managers have time on their hands. If they started volunteering, they could help many nonprofits navigate the next couple of years. John Gomperts of Civic Ventures' Experience Corps points out that that flood of people could be a tremendous asset to the organization; the key now is to determine how to access and tap their talents.
  • "Fast Company's Top 10 Social Enterprises 2009: Civic Ventures"
    Change.org (blog)
    By Nathaniel Whittemore
    January 21, 2009
    Full article
    "Each year, my favorite magazine Fast Company publishes a list of their top ten social enterprises, organizations who use market forces to achieve social missions....It seemed appropriate, after this morning's post about Obama's good news for social entrepreneurs to write about Civic Ventures. The idea behind Civic Ventures is pretty simple: the incredible talent and experience accumulated by retiring Baby Boomers should have the opportunity to be put to use towards social change. With so many people interested in encore careers, and so many organizations in the nonprofit and social enterprise space looking for experience and specific skills, it seems like a real opportunity to connect supply with demand."
  • "Alum's project to help black farmers wins national award"
    Union College Union News
    January 16, 2009
    Full article
    As a chemistry student at Union, Joseph James '69 had his sights set on a career in the sciences. But then a national tragedy changed those plans. "I guess it was in my junior year Martin Luther King was killed, at a time when he was working on the economics of being a free person," James recently recalled. "It became very clear to me that I didn't want to spend my life in a lab. I wanted to be involved with the community, particularly on the economic side." That passion fueled a lifelong career in economic development and recently earned James a 2008 Purpose Prize worth $100,000 for one of his latest initiatives, The Greening of Black America - A Rural Development Opportunity. The project, like much of his other work, creates economic practices that maintain equity for disadvantaged people and communities.
  • "First U.S. woman to attempt Everest faces challenge with toxins research"
    Oakland Tribune
    By Kristine Bender
    January 13, 2009
    Full article
    Arlene Blum has done some mind-boggling things in her 63 years. But even after climbing some of the world's highest mountains, writing two books, and earning a Ph.D. in biophysical chemistry, the Berkeley woman says working to reduce toxic chemicals in consumer products is one of the most rewarding things she's ever done. In 1976, Blum was the first American woman to attempt to climb Mount Everest. In 1981-82, Blum walked a couple thousand miles across the Himalayas, and 21 years ago she hiked 600 miles across the European Alps with her baby daughter on her back. Last year, Blum launched the nonprofit organization the Green Science Policy Institute, which provides scientific data to government, industry, and nongovernmental organizations around the world to bring about more informed decision making about chemicals used in consumer products. Blum was named a 2009 Civic Ventures Purpose Prize winner for her work.
  • "Kudos"
    News and Observer (NC)
    January 10, 2009
    Full article
    For his efforts in organizing Habitat for Humanity's Builders Blitz, Tom Gipson was named a Civic Ventures Purpose Prize Fellow for innovation and extraordinary contribution in an encore career, after age 60. The Purpose Prize is part of Civic Ventures' Encore Careers campaign, which engages baby boomers in encore careers that combine social impact, personal meaning and continued income in the second half of life.
  • "Act 2: Five BU alums ditched their careers to follow their passion, make a difference - or both"
    BU Today
    By Edward A. Brown, Cynthia K. Buccini, Natalie Jacobson McCracken, and Katie Koch
    January 8, 2009
    Full article
    Profiles of 5 dymanic Boston University alumni who are living a new kind of American dream - the dream of ditching the sensible occupation you trained for and launching a second career that is more meaningful. They're part of a movement: approximately 9.5 percent of Americans between the ages of 44 and 70 - some 5 million to 8.5 million - are working in so-called encore careers. Civic Ventures VP Phyllis Segal defines an encore career as work that combines income, personal meaning, and social impact. "Social purpose work is most often in the nonprofit or public sector, but it could be in for-profit work where social purpose is more compelling or as compelling as the bottom line."
  • Do-Gooders of '09: Making Resolutions that Matter"
    Encore Online
    January 7, 2009
    Full article
    Among the resolutions for 2009: Take steps to end world hunger. Volunteer at Wilmington's (NC) very own Full Belly Project. Every Saturday volunteers assist the award-winning organization by designing and distributing income-generating agricultural devices to improve life in developing countries. One top example is the peanut sheller, which was invented by Full Belly's very own Jock Brandis, winner of the 2008 Civic Ventures Purpose Prize, awarded in December. Brandis and company work toward helping residents of rural communities in developing countries live lives of abundance -- waking each morning to days of economic possibility and going to sleep each night with full bellies.
  • "A supporter of mid-lifers"
    The Straits Times (Asia)
    January 7, 2009
    Full article
    Marc Freedman, 50, is the founder and CEO of Civic Ventures, a San Francisco-based advocacy group which encourages older people to begin socially-productive second careers. In the mid-1990s, he spearheaded the creation of Experience Corps, and helped set up the Purpose Prize in 2006. He is author of Encore: Finding Work That Matters In The Second Half of Life and Prime Time: How Baby Boomers Will Revolutionize Retirement And Transform America. His new book, On Purpose: Boomers, Work, And The Search For A Calling, will be out next year.
  • "Success doesn't require any special skill, except passion"
    Rediff India Abroad
    January 2, 2009
    Full article
    An interview with Purpose Prize winner Ray Umashankar. Umashankar who has an artificial hip, climbed the 19,340-foot Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa, to honor his son Naren, who killed himself following a bout of depression. Six years later, Professor Umashankar, an assistant dean at the College of Engineering at the University of Arizona, runs a two-year old organization called Achieving Sustainable Social Equality through Technology to help children of sex workers in India find high-tech jobs. Umashankar was awarded a $10,000 Purpose Prize for his work.
  • "Chen honored for work with Asian community"
    Akron.com
    By Kathleen Folkerth
    January 1, 2009
    Full article
    May Chen,61, has dedicated two decades of her life to helping Ohio's Asian-American and Pacific Islander population and has now been named a 2008 Purpose Prize fellow for her efforts. Chen co-founded Asian Services in Action, an Akron- and Cleveland-based nonprofit that provides social services to AAPI youths, adults and seniors.
  • "Second Spin"
    Governing.com
    By Will Wilson
    January 2009
    Full article
    Some states and localities are figuring out how to bend their hiring practices by tapping into a pool of experienced retirees to fill seasonal, part-time, and even full-time jobs. In Arizona, a regional office of an initiative known as Aging 2020 creates training opportunities for seniors, certifies the best places for them to work, and matches them with employers in both the public and private sectors. The effort is critical in a state where the over-65 population will quadruple within two decades. Civic Ventures president Marc Freedman says the approach can be replicated nationally. Government can begin by removing barriers to longer working lives, including financial disincentives to continued work. A move to flexible schedules also can help.

 

More Civic Ventures in the News

Ask not...the sixties generation turns 60
Ask not...the sixties generation turns 60

The first baby boomers turning 60 are the same generation that John F. Kennedy famously challenged to ask themselves what they could do for their country. This same generation is now positioned to lead another social movement based on sharing life experience. They couldn't come along at a better time.


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